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Academic Bulletin 2015

FULTON

a University College



















ACADEMIC BULLETIN 2015

Updated July 2015

























Owned and operated by the Trans Pacific Union of the Seventh-day Adventist Church

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

OVERVIEW

STATEMENT OF VALUES

STATEMENT OF PHILOSOPHY

PURPOSE

GUIDING PRINCIPLES

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND

REGIONAL PERSPECTIVE

ACADEMIC RECOGNITION

PROGRAMS OF STUDY

QUALITY ASSURANCE

GOVERNANCE

ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

FACULTY & STAFF

CONTACT INFORMATION

 

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS

ADMISSION POLICIES AND PROCESSES

REGISTRATION

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT PROCESS

PLANNING A STUDY PROGRAM

Academic Advice and Student Responsibility

Study Load by Academic Levels

Student Status and Time Limitation

Attendance Requirements

Change of Modules

Withdrawing from a Module

Auditing a Module

ASSESSMENT AND PROGRESSION POLICIES

Purpose of Assessment

Assessment Procedures

Research Ethics Committee Approval

Submission of Assignments

Deadlines for Assignments

Late Submission of Assignments

Practicum Assessment

Examination Procedures

Plagiarism

Grades

Grading Process

Special Circumstances

Progression Rules

Supplementary Assessment Policy

Modules Failed Twice

Academic Probation

Academic Termination

ACADEMIC CREDIT REGULATIONS

Credits from Previous Study at Fulton College

Credits from Study at Other Approved Tertiary Institutions

Credits from Prior Experiential Learning

Credits from Challenge Examinations

GRADUATION POLICIES AND REGULATIONS

Requirements for Graduation

Academic Excellence

Graduation Class

Graduation in Absentia

Academic Regalia

Transcripts

Reissuing of Testamur

QUALITY ASSURANCE POLICY & PROCESS

Policy

Process

APPEALS

Academic Appeals

Appeals re Withdrawal from a Module or Academic Termination

 

PROGRAMS OF STUDY

CURRICULUM RATIONALE

BACHELOR OF BUSINESS [Accounting & Management]

BACHELOR OF BUSINESS [Information Systems]

BACHELOR OF BUSINESS [Marketing]

BACHELOR OF EDUCATION HONS [Primary]

Postgraduate Diploma in Education

Graduate Diploma in Adventist Education

BACHELOR OF EDUCATION [Early Childhood]

BACHELOR OF THEOLOGY HONS

Postgraduate Diploma in Theology

Graduate Diploma in Theology

Graduate Diploma in Adventist Studies

CERTIFICATE IN FOUNDATION STUDIES

 

MODULE SYNOPSES

 

EXTERNAL MODERATORS



OVERVIEW

Fulton College is registered with the Fiji Higher Education Commission [FHEC] as a University College. As a member of a world-wide chain of Higher Education Institutions owned and operated by the Seventh-day Adventist church it is also accredited by the Accrediting Association of Seventh-day Adventist Schools, College and Universities [AAA]. The Theology programs offered by the College are also accredited by the South Pacific Association of Theological Schools [SPATS]. Fulton is owned and operated by the Trans-Pacific Union of Seventh-day Adventists.

             The Vision of Fulton is to be a tertiary institution whose graduates demonstrate Christian values in their personal and professional lives.

             The Mission of Fulton is to empower graduates through quality Adventist Higher Education for dedicated service to the South Pacific Community.


STATEMENT OF VALUES

Fulton values growing spiritually, mentally, socially and physically through ...

A vibrant relationship with the supernatural Creator God

Convictions about God’s loving care and leading in our lives

An openness to explore, think, innovate and apply

Academic honesty and excellence

Integrity, mutual respect and inclusiveness in all relationships

Valuing and honouring people for who they are

Restoration through grace over retaliation

Caring for our bodies through diet, work, rest and abstinence

Simplicity of lifestyle

Selfless and responsible service

“And Jesus grew in wisdom and stature and in favour with God and men.” Luke 2:52 (NIV)


STATEMENT OF PHILOSOPHY

Education at Fulton is based on a biblical worldview. This view asserts that an eternal loving God, through Christ created this world as part of a perfect Universe which He continues to sustain by His power through the laws He has ordained. Although created perfect in God’s image, mankind’s free choice led to alienation from the Creator. This broken relationship resulted in a fallen nature out of harmony with God, and a blighted creation. Through His infinite love God instituted a plan of salvation through the life, death and resurrection of His Son Jesus Christ. This plan provides for the restoration of a harmonious relationship between mankind and the Creator, and the hope of eternal life.

             Therefore, it is our intention to provide educational programs that embrace a holistic approach to true education for the training of the whole person. Intellectually to impart relevant, up-to-date knowledge so that students develop mental capacity to think critically and analytically and not mere reflectors of others thoughts. Physically, education is intended to involve students in work programs and recreation activities to gain physical work and also improve their physical well-being. Socially, we want to help students improve their ability to interact and be able to create and maintain healthy relationships. Spiritually, we desire to help students develop faith which contributes to the restoration of the whole being in harmony with God’s ideal. Further, to build character and values which are based on the revelation of God both in scripture and in nature.

             Thus we believe that Fulton College will produce graduates who are qualified and empowered to serve God and humanity.


PURPOSE

Spiritual

To demonstrate to students that Christianity is relevant to their era and that Christian Philosophy touches every area of life.

To encourage students to become and remain aware of the importance of their individual commitment to God.

To provide opportunities for and encourage students to develop and maintain their own personal devotional life.

To provide opportunities for students to make and secure lifetime decisions for Christ in worships, Church services, Bible classes and through personal interaction with staff and other students.

To provide opportunities for students to participate in Church outreach and worship programs.


Intellectual

To demonstrate that all areas of academic study need to be approached within a true Christian framework.

To assist students to recognise and achieve their full potential, both academically and throughout life.

To encourage the achievement of academic excellence through co-operation rather than competition.

To identify students who may be experiencing difficulties (for whatever reason) and to provide appropriate remediation and counselling.


Social

To prepare students for responsible citizenship, leadership and family life.

To foster harmony in all social interactions by encouraging understanding, respect and love for all people, whether from the same culture or cross-culturally.

To encourage healthy and responsible Christian interaction between the sexes.

To provide opportunities for students to develop lasting friendships across the barriers of religion, age, race and culture.

To develop in students a sense of responsibility and accountability for all they do.

 

Physical

To foster balanced physical development through a well-developed work-study program.

To encourage students to adopt and practise sound health principles.

To provide a broad range of activities whereby students can develop skills that will be useful in later life.


GUIDING PRINCIPLES

In their work as Christian educators the faculty and staff of Fulton College commit themselves to the following guiding principles:

Integrity

Excellence in all that is attempted

Commitment to God, people, tasks and the institution

Respect for all

Understanding others

Forgiveness as an expression of grace

Compassion for all in need


HISTORICAL BACKGROUND

The needs for a training school in Fiji for Seventh-day Adventists was recognized at the turn of the century by pioneer missionary John E. Fulton. Property was secured at Buresala on the island of Ovalau and the Buresala Training School was opened in 1905. Other training institutions were later established in Navuso (Wainibuka, Viti Levu), Samabula (Suva) and Vatuvonu (Vanu Levu).

             In order to respond to rising educational standards and to overcome the inconvenience of the Ovalau and Navuso sites, the Church decided to consolidate their educational work in Fiji. A site on King’s Rd Tailevu, about 50 kilometres from Suva, was secured and the relocation and construction of new premises commenced in 1940. A number of buildings from the old school sites (Buresala and Navuso) were dismantled, transported to the new site and reconstructed. The new institution, named in honour of Pastor John E. Fulton, opened in 1941 and quickly drew enrolments from all parts of the South Pacific. In 2014, Fulton relocated to a new property at Sabeto near to Nadi Airport.

             With the growth of the church in Papua New Guinea, the Church made a decision to build a new institution near Port Moresby. Classes started in 1984 and the degree programmes transferred from Fulton College to Pacific Adventist University (as it is now called). Current enrolment on the campus of Pacific Adventist University is approximately 1000 students.

             Since the establishment of Pacific Adventist University, Fulton has continued to respond to the educational needs of the Pacific Islands and has developed its programmes to degree level, gained accreditation from some regional bodies and seen its graduates employed by organisations and governments throughout the region.

             In order to achieve greater synergy between its educational institutions, the Church has established the Pacific Adventist University Consortium, of which Fulton College is a member. The purpose of this consortium is to provide greater quality assurance, transferability of credits and synergies in infrastructure.


REGIONAL PERSPECTIVE

With Fiji being the largest of the Pacific Islands, Fulton College serves as a regional training institution attracting students from Fiji, American Samoa, Cook Islands, French Polynesia, Kiribati, Tonga, Tuvalu, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, Western Samoa and also some from Papua New Guinea. The College also seeks to employ faculty and staff from these countries to encourage this regional perspective. Currently 52% of students come from Fiji, 24% from Vanuatu, 11% from the Solomon Islands, and 13% from other Pacific Island countries. Almost half of the twenty academic staff are Fijian, the other half come from other Pacific Islands, Australia, NZ and the UK.


ACADEMIC RECOGNITION

Fulton’s programs are recognised academically by:

Since 2012, Fulton has been registered by the Fiji Higher Education Commission [FHEC] as a University College. Re-accreditation of the institution is scheduled for 2017. As a result, Fulton’s qualifications have been placed on the Fiji Register of Qualifications. Applications for the accreditation of all qualifications offered at Fulton have been submitted to the FHEC.

Since 1987, the Accrediting Association of Seventh-day Adventist Schools, Colleges and Universities [AAA] - a professional organisation which peer reviews the operations of all Seventh-day Adventist institutions throughout the world - has accredited Fulton. The last accreditation visit was in 2012 with accreditation continuing until December 2016.

Since 1989, the South Pacific Association of Theological Schools [SPATS] has accredited the Diploma in Theology. The latest SPATS accreditation visit was in 2014, when SPATS accredited the Bachelor of Theology (Hons) and its nested Bachelor of Theology and Diploma in Theology until 2019.

In 2013, Fulton signed a Memorandum of Understanding, to work collaboratively with other Adventist Higher Education Institutions in Australia and the South Pacific. These institutions include Avondale College of Higher Education [Australia], Pacific Adventist University [PNG], Sonoma Adventist College [PNG], Atoifi Adventist School of Nursing [Solomon Islands] and Mamarapha College [Australia].


PROGRAMS OF STUDY

On Campus

Postgraduate Diplomas - Level 8

Postgraduate Diploma in Education [Primary]

Postgraduate Diploma in Theology

Honours Degrees - Level 8

Bachelor of Education Honours [Primary]

Bachelor of Theology Honours


Bachelor Degrees - Level 7

Bachelor of Business [Accounting & Management]

Bachelor of Business [Information Systems]

Bachelor of Business [Marketing]

Bachelor of Education [Early Childhood]

Bachelor of Education [Primary]

Bachelor of Theology


Graduate Diplomas - Level 7

Graduate Diploma in Adventist Education

Graduate Diploma in Adventist Studies

Graduate Diploma in Theology


Undergraduate Diplomas - Level 6

Diploma in Business [Accounting & Management]

Diploma in Business [Information Systems]

Diploma in Business [Marketing]

Diploma in Education [Early Childhood]

Diploma in Education [Primary]

Diploma in Theology


Undergraduate Certificates - Level 4

Certificate in Foundation Studies


Off Campus

Certificate in Education [Teaching Practice]

Certificate in Theology [Ministry Practice]


QUALITY ASSURANCE

Programs of study at Fulton College are regularly reviewed and subjected to rigorous quality assurance controls. The quality assurance process at Fulton College involves personnel and processes, both internal and external to the institution, including internal annual evaluations of programs and performance management of faculty and staff; and external assessments of the institution’s practice and standards.


Internal

Other regular quality assurance processes involve:

-           internal moderation of examinations and assessment by Heads of department

-           external moderation of examinations and assessments by External Moderators (academics of regional institutions) who report to the internal Examination Boards

-           student feedback surveys of the teaching and learning experience at Fulton College.

-           Faculty self-evaluation


External

Fulton College is also recognised by the Fiji Higher Education Commission and the Department of Education Accreditation Board.

             The South Pacific Association of Theological Schools (SPATS) who first accredited the Diploma in Theology in 1989. Discussions are currently under way to accredit the Bachelor of Theology.

             One aspect of this process involves the College’s voluntary participation with other Adventist institutions and governing bodies in a recognition process that involves periodic inspections and site visits by international teams of higher education specialists. Self-study documents and annual reports are prepared to facilitate the visits which are coordinated by the Adventist Accrediting Association. Participation by the institution in this mutual review process also serves the purpose of assuring Adventist international constituencies that Fulton College meets internationally established standards and criteria for academic excellence.


GOVERNANCE

Fulton is governed by the Board of Governors appointed by the Trans Pacific Union Executive Committee at the beginning of each quinquennium. The Board of Governors meets twice a year (June & November) and has an Executive which meets in between times. The function of the Board is to provide a strategic direction for the College, approving policies and monitoring their implementation in the life of the College and holding the Administration of the College to account as a critical friend.


College Board of Governors 2011-2015

Pr Glenn Townend, MA (Avondale) (Chair), President, Trans Pacific Union*

Dr Stephen Currow, DMin (Fuller)(Secretary), Principal, Fulton College

Prof Ben Thomas, MBA (Open)Vice Chancellor, PAU

Mr Ken Weslake, MEd (La Sierra)Education Director, SPD*

Mr Francois Keet, BCom Hons (Johannesburg)Chief Financial Officer, TPU

Mr Beverly Norman, MEd (La Sierra)Education Director, TPU

Pr Maveni Kaufononga, MA (Avondale)General Secretary, TPU

Pr Luke Narabe, BA (PAU)President, Fiji Mission*

Pr Uili Solofa, BA (PAU)President, Samoa Mission

             Mr Barry Ilaisa, MDev Adm (ANU)                             Tutor, School of Management, USP

Mr Clayton Kuma, MCom Hons (Auckland)Ass Lecturer, School of Accounting, USP

Mrs Salusalu Manoa, MA (USP)

Mr A Rokotuni, LLB (USP)

VacancyTBA

             *           Appointed in 2013.



ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

There are six subcommittees of the Board: Finance; Audit; Personnel; Quality Assurance; Strategic Planning; and Appeals Committees. These receive reports from the institution and address issues from an external perspective making recommendations on which the Board can act.

             Internally, the highest authority is the Administrative Committee. This meets monthly and receives reports from its five subcommittees: Academic; Infrastructure; Student Affairs; PR/Promotion/Alumni; and Discipline Committees. It is comprised of the Officers of the College, the Heads of the Academic Departments and elected representatives of the Faculty and Staff. The Officers of the College inform the Administrative Committee, but also receive direction from this Committee.

             The Academic Committee monitors the overall academic program of the College, receiving reports from the Academic Departments and the Learning Resources Committee. It also oversees the professional development of the Faculty and the accreditation and quality assurance of the academic programs.

             The Infrastructure Committee monitors the development and maintenance of the institution, and the physical resources of the teaching and learning process including the internet.

             The Student Affairs Committee monitors the co-curricular student life of the College, including the spiritual, social, residential and work responsibilities. The Student Council report to this Committee which also includes significant student representation.

             The PR/Promotion/Alumni Committee monitor the profile of the College positioning it as a tertiary institution in the Pacific Islands, recruiting students and maintaining relationships with the many Alumni scattered throughout the Pacific Islands and the Pacific Rim.

             In the flowchart black shapes represent Committees and grey shapes represent key people.


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FACULTY & STAFF

Executive Officers

PrincipalDr Stephen Currow, DMin

Deputy PrincipalDr Rejeli Liligeto, PhD

Business ManagerMrs Elise Napa’a, BBus

Director of Student ServicesMr Jeffesen Trief, MEd


Faculty

             Benjamin Asa                            Lecturer (Pastoral Studies), Theology

MMin, Avondale College, AustraliaSolomon Islands

             Raijeli Caucau*                          Course Director Foundation & Lecturer (English),

PG Dip [Language, Literature and Communication], University of FijiFiji

             Paul Cavanagh                           Head of Department & Lecturer (Biblical), Theology

MA [Religion], Andrews University; MPH, Loma Linda University, USANZ

             Stephen Currow                        Principal & Ass Professor (Ministry & Mission), Theology

DMin, Fuller Theological Seminary, USAAustralia

             Ledion Gjokola*                        Course Director & Lecturer (Church History), Theology

MTh, Australian Lutheran College; Dip Ed, La Trobe, AustAustralia/Albania

             Fred Kataiwai*                          Course Director & Lecturer (Acct/Mgmt), Business

BBus [Accounting & Management], Pacific Adventist University, PNGFiji

             Nalini Kumar*                           Ass Lecturer (ECE), Education

Dip Children Services, APTC, Fiji/AustraliaFiji

             Lusiana Leitabu                         Lecturer (Primary Ed), Education

MEd, Avondale College, AustraliaFiji

             Rusina Leitabu*                        Lecturer (Accounting/Computing), Business

PG Dip [Professional Accounting], USP, FijiFiji

             Rejeli Liligeto                             Deputy & Lecturer (Marketing/Management), Business

PhD [Marketing], USP, FijiFiji

             Nellie Manuca                           Registrar & Lecturer (Info Systems), Business

BA [Info Systems], Massey University, NZFiji

Domnic Pillay

MA [Religion], Andrews University, USA (Spicer Campus India)Fiji

             Pauline Potter*                         Course Director & Senior Lecturer, Education

MEd Hons, Avondale College, AustraliaAustralia/UK

             Vaseva Ratu                               Associate Librarian

BEd [English], Loma Linda University, USA; Dip Lib & Info Services, USP, FijiFiji

             Jackson Ray*                             Librarian

Dip Library & Info Services, UPNG, Papua New GuineaSolomon Islands

             Valrie Senikau*                         Tutor, Future School

BEd Primary, Fulton, FijiFiji

             Anil Singh*                                 Lecturer (Acc & Mgmt), Business

PG Dip [Professional Accounting], USP, FijiFiji

             Kelera Sukanabulisau               Lecturer (Primary Ed), Education

MEd, USP, FijiFiji

             Josevata Sumo                          Lecturer (Primary Ed), Education

MEd, USP, FijiFiji

             Akanisi Tabore-Lanyon            Head of Department & Lecturer (Primary Ed), Education

MEd, USP, FijiFiji

             Ragoso Tagaloa                         Lecturer, Theology

MA [Theology], Avondale College, AustraliaAustralia/Samoa

             Derrick Tagosia*                       Lecturer (Information Systems), Business

BSc [Info Systems], USP, FijiSolomon Islands

             Debra Tavita                              Lecturer (Secondary Education), Education

MEd [Curriculum], Avondale, AustraliaAmerican Samoa

             Cecile Trief*                               Assistant Librarian

MEd [Admin], Avondale, AustraliaFrench Polynesia


Adjunct Faculty

             Meri Vuloaloa*                         Lecturer (Economics), Business

BCom [Economics], USP, FijiFiji

* Indicates that the faculty are undertaking further studies, usually on a part-time basis supported by Fulton.


Staff

             Taimoaieta Bakia                      Cook

             Lemau Dakuitoga                      Director Ladies’ Residence

             Inoke Katia                                 Cook

             Viliame Ligai                              Supervisor Greens

             Sione Napa’a                            Assistant Maintenance

             Luisa Naruma                            PA Student Services

             Tikiko Naruma                           Assistant Accountant

             Bruce Potter                              Media/Promotions

             Ananaiasa Senikau                   Supervisor Bookstore/Canteen

             Artika Singh                               Accountant

             Laisenia Soqali                           Farm Manager

             Peni Taimanisau                       Property Manager

             Peni Vosavakadua                    Director Mens’ Residence

             Moape Vuloaloa                       Assistant Accountant

             Raijeli Vuloaloa                         Supervisor Cleaning

             Senitiki Vuniyaro                       Chaplain/Church Pastor

             Liku Wailiwaliwa                       Director Food Services

             Alena Yalidole                           Supervisor IT

             Mesake Yalidole                        Supervisor Campus


CONTACT INFORMATION

Telephone Numbers

             Telephone                                  (679) 400 5111 / (679) 999 3118 / (679) 776 0794

 

             Facsimile                                    (679) 400 5110

International callers are reminded to adjust their phone calls to the Fiji time zone.


Mailing Address

Fulton College

Private Mail Bag

NADI AIRPORT

             FIJI ISLANDS


Electronic Addresses

             General information                www.fulton.ac.fj

info@fulton.ac.fj


Office Hours

             Monday to Thursday                8.30am – 12.30pm & 1.30pm – 5.00pm

             Friday                                          8.30am – 12.00pm

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS


ADMISSION POLICIES AND PROCESSES

Fulton welcomes qualified applicants without regard to race, colour, gender or marital status. While the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the South Pacific sponsors and financially supports the institution, and the majority of students are Seventh-day Adventists, the College requires no specific religious affiliation for admission. Subject to available space, admission to and continued enrolment at the institution is dependent on evidence of good character, intellectual competence and a willingness to respect the faith, beliefs, missions and lifestyle expectations of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Fulton is also committed to respecting the religious convictions of all students so that they also can worship free from lectures, exams and work.

             Fulton is committed to sound scholarship and learning. Entrance levels for each program is included in the respective Appendix. Each department carefully monitors the level of academic rigour in each course of study, and follows a program of progressive academic assessment designed to teach personal accountability and responsibility in all academic areas.

             A high standard of spoken and written English is expected of all students enrolled in College courses. Future School software provides a tool for students to improve their literacy and numeracy.

             Fulton provides a balanced educational program that fosters the intellectual, physical, emotional, social and spiritual growth of its students. Fulton emphasizes not only personal and professional development but also the acceptance of values that motivate its graduates toward lives of dedicated service to the glory of God in the wider community.

             All students accepted for study at Fulton must sign an agreement that while registered students of the College that they will adhere to the high moral standards of the college and not consume alcohol, use tobacco, betel nut and illicit drugs on or off campus or bring such substances onto the campus.

             The Seventh-day Sabbath is commemorated from sunset Friday evening to sunset Saturday evening. Students are expected to respect this period and refrain from activities that would interfere with the personal and organised worship programs during this period. All students are invited to attend and participate in these worship programs.

             Security of students and staff is a concern of the College. Students are expected to support the various security initiatives undertaken by the College Administration.


Applications

Application forms for studying at Fulton are available from:

-           Fulton College - website, email, telephone or in person

-           Seventh-day Adventist Secondary Schools throughout the Trans Pacific Union

-           Education Directors throughout the Trans Pacific Union

Applications should include the following documents:

-           A completed official Application Form

-           Passport-size photographs     (1 for Fijian students; 3 for overseas students)

-           Certified copies of relevant documents:

             -           Birth certificate

             -           Baptismal certificate (Theology only)

-           Certificates and Results confirming students’ qualifications

-           Academic and Character references (sent direct to College by referees)

-           Medical clearance

-           Police report

-           Fee guarantee statement

Completed application forms and the above supporting documents should be sent directly to:

The Registrar

Fulton College

Private Mail Bag

NADI AIRPORT

FIJI ISLANDS

Applications should be submitted by 15th January of each year. Applications will be considered only if all the required information is enclosed with the application form.

             All documents submitted with your application will NOT be returned. If you do not wish to submit original documents then you should submit copies that have been certified by a Commissioner of Oaths, a Senior Civil Servant, or a School Principal. Your application will be rejected if documents show alterations, erasures of any kind, or falsification. The Academic Office may require the sighting of original documents before confirming an applicant's acceptance to the College. If subsequently, it is discovered that the presented documents had been altered or are forgeries, Fulton will immediately deregister that student and annul any credits earned.


Admission Process

The Academic Committee has delegated this responsibility to the Registrar. Where the Registrar has questions they will consult the specific department concerned. The Registrar will report on admission to the Deputy Principal and the Academic Committee.

             Fulton may decline to admit any persons in any year or course of study on the following grounds:

-           Applicants not satisfying the academic requirements at Fulton or at other higher institution.

-           applications exceeding the quotas that have been set by the Academic Committee for a given course

-           Applicants not satisfying Fulton’s high moral standards.

Fulton reserves the right to decline admission to any person without necessarily specifying the reason.


Admission Responses to Application

Applicants will be advised by mail as soon as practicable that Fulton has received their applications. The Registrar will normally send an Offer Letter to successful applicants within one month of receiving your application.


Student Responses to Offers of Acceptance

Offers of a place at Fulton are open for a limited time only, and successful applicants must advise the Registrar in writing of their acceptance of the offer. Applicants who omit to advise the College within the given specified time may have their offers withdrawn and the Admissions Office may reallocate them to other applicants.


Overseas Students Immigration Requirements

All students travelling to Fulton from overseas must bring with them:

-           Full open return airline/ship ticket

-           Valid passport

-           Police Clearance

-           Medical Certificate

-           3 passport-size photographs

-           Offer Letter

-           Birth Certificate

Married students must also provide the following for their spouse and children;

-           Birth certificate

-           Medical Certificate

-           Marriage Certificate

-           Police Clearance (16 yrs and over)

-           Two passport photos

-           Open return airline/ship ticket.

Under no circumstances may a student, or dependent relatives travel to Fiji without a full open return ticket or an onwards ticket to a country where he/she has entry rights.

             Upon arrival on campus, foreign students must deposit their passports and return ticket for safekeeping with the Director of Student Services.


REGISTRATION

All new and returning students must complete registration/enrolment formalities before they commence or resume study at Fulton College. This normally occurs the week before classes commence. An Orientation session is scheduled for all students.

             New students or returning students who have taken a break from study at Fulton College must have formal written authority from the Academic Registrar before proceeding with registration.


Registration Procedures

The following outlines the general registration process:

-           Obtain financial clearance from the Business Office. Students are encouraged to do this prior to arriving at Fulton to speed up their registration.

-           Arrange the semester's academic program with the Course Director (for returning students, this step may be taken as part of a pre-registration process towards the end of the previous semester).

-           Confirm contact details for next of kin and student sponsors.

-           Sign a statement of acceptance for any special academic conditions attached to the student's study at Fulton College.

-           Collect a Student ID card

-           Submit the completed registration form to the Academic Office.

             The following additional steps are involved in first semester registration or in the registration of students returning to Fulton College after a break from study:

-           Provide required personal information to the Director of Student Services.

-           Arrange individual work programs with the Student Work Coordinator.

-           Sign the Acceptance Form of all College regulations, (including the Student Handbook, Academic Bulletin and Financial Policies) provided by the Student Services Office, Academic Registry and Business Office.

-           Complete the competencies testing:

                          Computer Skills                         All New students

                          Literacy & Numeracy               All New students

                          Conversational Vernacular     Fiji citizens studying Education & Theology

                          Adventist Doctrine                   Theology students

-           Complete any pre-requisites test


Late Registration

A student who does not complete registration during the scheduled period will normally be charged $50 for the first day or part thereof, and $5 a day for each additional day or part thereof. Ignorance of regulations, misreading timetables, lack of finance, or missing scheduled transport arrangements are not considered acceptable reasons for late registration. A late registrant will not be given exemption from any assignment or test given during the period for which they are not registered. A student will not normally be registered after Friday, Week 2 of the semester.


INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

Fulton is committed to providing inclusive education. This is done by providing equal opportunities for all students to study at Fulton and ensuring as far as possible the elimination of bias and discrimination in its treatment of students both inside and outside the classroom. Students with known impairments are requested to complete the appropriate section of the Application Form indicating the support required, so as to enable Fulton to make appropriate arrangements.


Physical access

During the construction of the new campus, Fulton intentionally built facilities which would enable students with physical impairments to participate in all aspects of campus life.


Learning Support

Fulton believes in all students being taught in mainstream classes whilst being offered additional support, appropriate to their needs, to help them reach their full potential. To this end, the following support and advice will be facilitated or provided:

-           assessment of the student’s basic skills and other needs to ascertain support requirements;

-           provision of appropriate services (identified during the assessment process) to enable the student to participate in their program of study;

-           provision of on-going support to the student during their program of study;

-           provision of on-going support and advice to faculty and staff working with the student.


Examination arrangements

The Examination Officer is committed to making special arrangements so that the examination process will be as painless as possible for students with learning difficulties and/or disabilities. However, it is important that students inform the examination section of any requests for such assistance at the earliest opportunity, as the process may take some time. They will make an application on your behalf. In some cases an assessment by an Educational Psychologist may be required. Special arrangements can include:

-           extra time - could be up to 50% extra

-           taking examinations in a specially prepared room

-           specially prepared scripts e.g. enlarged type, coloured paper

-           readers and script writer provided

-           provision of computers

-           rest breaks.


Staff contacts

The Registrar is responsible for ensuring the inclusion of students in the academic program of the institution, while the Director of Student Services is responsible for ensuring the inclusion of students in the co-curricular program of the institution.


CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT PROCESS

Fulton uses the following process to develop their curriculum:

1

Product Description

A.               Contextual Analysis – Demographic Trends

B.               Employer/Alumni Consultation

C.               Regional Networking & Benchmarking

D.              Government/Professional Requirements

E.               Production Definition

2

Curriculum Development

A.               Develop Learning Outcomes & indicative evidence to demonstrate the achievement of these Learning Outcomes.

B.               Department develops Curriculum

C.               Feedback from externals

D.              Recommend to the Fulton Academic Committee with supporting rationale and analysis of implications for staffing budgets and other College department.

3

Accrediting Approvals

A.               Fulton Academic Committee recommend to the appropriate Advisory Committee (MinTAC, TTAC, Business TBA)

B.               Recommend to Fulton Board

C.               Recommend to Accrediting Bodies – FHEC, SPATS, etc

D.              Recommend to Trans Pacific Union Executive

E.               Recommend to South Pacific Division Advisories


PLANNING A STUDY PROGRAM

A standard Bachelor's program takes three years to complete while a Diploma program takes two years to complete. A full-time study load consists of sixty credit points, (normally 4 modules per semester), plus any midyear practicum that is outlined in the course programs in this Bulletin. Students are expected to complete their study program according to the published sequence. Students must complete at least 75% of any level prior to progressing to the next level. Overloads would only be considered if students had obtained a GPA of at least 2.33 in the semester preceding the one in which they plan to take the overload.


Academic Advice and Student Responsibility

The previous paragraphs all underscore the importance of a student carefully working together with their Course Director to plan their future course structure whenever they fail a module, are placed on academic probation, contemplate withdrawing from a module, or contemplate any other deviation from the published course.

             It should be remembered that while the College provides a Course Director, it is ultimately the responsibility of each student to ensure that they meet the course requirements and are thus able to graduate according to plan.

             Fulton reserves the right to inform sponsors and parents of difficulties that a student may be facing in study, as well as informing them of a student's successes.


Study Load by Academic Levels

The following table outlines the notional load for an academic module. Professional/language modules will have graduated loading equivalent to that for academic module.

REQUIREMENTS

Level 4

Level 5

Level 6

Level 7

Level 8

Foundation

Certificate

Diploma

Degree

Honours

Credits per module

 

15 credits

15 credits

15 credits

15 credits

30 credits

Hours of Notional Learning (10 hours per credit)

 

150 hours per module

150 hours per module

150 hours per module

150 hours per module

300 hours per module

Structured Learning (Lectures, Tutorials etc)

 

4 hours per week

52 hours per module

4 hours per week

52 hours per module

4 hours per week

52 hours per module

4 hours per week

52 hours per module

4-6 hours per week

52-78 hours per module

Unstructured Learning (Researching, Writing, Studying, Discussions with Lecturers etc)

 

7-8 hours per week

7-8 hours per week

7-8 hours per week

7-8 hours per week

14-16 hours per week

Assessment Word Count (including examinations)

 

2,500 words per module

10,000 words per semester

3,000 words per module

12,000 words per semester

4,000 words per module

16,000 words per semester

5,000 words per module

20,000 words per semester

 10,000 words per module

20,000 words per semester

Examination

 

Notionally 500 words per hour

Notionally 500 words per hour

Notionally 750 words per hour

Notionally 1000 words per hour

Notionally 1000 words per hour


Student Status and Time Limitation

A student may study in full-time or part-time mode. However, students in the Residence Halls or On-campus Married Student Housing are normally expected to study in full-time mode. As explained below, this means that they must take sixty credits (4 modules) a semester.

Full-time

A full-time student in a three-year degree program must complete all course requirements in no more than four years. A full-time student in a two-year diploma program must complete all course requirements in no more than three years.

Part-time

A part-time student is one who attempts less than 45 credit points, (3 modules), a semester. A part-time student in a three-year degree program must complete all course requirements in no more than six years. A part-time student in a two-year diploma program must complete all course requirements in no more than four years.

Unless the Academic Committee decides that valid reasons exist for non-compliance, any full-time or part-time student whose studies extend for more than their respective stipulated maximum times will have his/her course of study terminated permanently. A student who voluntarily leaves Fulton before completing his/her course must apply for a leave of absence to cover the anticipated time of absence or the normal time limitations on courses will apply.


Attendance Requirements

Students are expected to attend all scheduled classes. Attendance rolls will be kept. It is understood that sickness and personal crises sometimes make one hundred percent attendance impossible. A minimum of eighty percent attendance is required for each module, ninety percent if a student is on academic probation.

             If a student has missed more than 20% of a module, the Course Board in which the module is taught may require the student to withdraw from the module thus becoming ineligible to sit the final examination. The normal withdrawal policies apply. Alternatively, under special circumstances, compensatory work may be assigned for students with absences up-to 33% of a module.

             Students will be given an initial verbal warning notifying them of their absences. Should absenteeism continue, this will be followed by a written warning. A final written warning will be given when the maximum permitted has been reached.


Change of Modules

Students wishing to change their modules after registration must apply to the Course Director on the prescribed form. A student shall not normally be permitted to change modules after Friday, Week 2 of the semester.


Withdrawing from a Module

A student may withdraw from a module at any time during the semester. However, the student is solely responsible for any impact that the withdrawal may have on his/her future program, e.g. disturbance in the sequencing of modules; the need to take a future overload or to extend one’s program, with no guarantee for residential students of their future residential status beyond the normal length of their course; or the immediate loss of residential status for any student registered for less than three modules a semester.

             A student who withdraws from a module after the second week and before the end of the eighth week of the semester or before the midpoint of an intensive module session will have a grade of W "Withdrawal" recorded on his/her academic transcript. A student who withdraws from a module after the end of the eighth week or the midpoint of an intensive module session will have a grade of WF "Withdrawal fail" recorded on his/her academic transcript.


Auditing a Module

Modules can only be audited under the following circumstances.

-           The student qualifies to study in the program which offers the module they would like to audit.

-           The student applies to the Academic Office to audit the module before the end of the first week of semester.

-           There must be a vacancy in the designated module. To audit a module the student pays half the standard fee for a module. (Practical fees may also apply). A receipt must be produced for the payment of the tuition fee before attending an audited module.

-           The student's Course Director, the module lecturer, and the Head of Department offering the module must approve the application.

-           No provision will be made in academic timetable for auditing a module.

-           No academic credit is awarded for any audited module.

-           Regular students will normally only be permitted to audit one module per semester

             An application form for auditing a module is available from the Academic Office. Approval to audit a module will be contingent upon a student's previous experience and/or academic performance, evidence that the module will benefit the auditor, and an undertaking that the auditor will regularly attend scheduled lectures, tutorials, and laboratory periods. An auditor will receive the official module outline, lecture notes, and handouts relevant to the module. They may submit assignments and sit for tests, but the lecturer may choose not to mark or return tests or assignments. An auditor is not permitted to sit the final examination. An auditor may be excluded from lectures, tutorials, and laboratory periods if the lecturer deems the auditor's attendance to be too irregular to have any substantial benefit.


ASSESSMENT AND PROGRESSION POLICIES

Purpose of Assessment

Throughout their study program, students will be formatively and summatively assessed by a variety of means including research papers, case studies, reflective critiques, presentations, tests and examinations. The purpose of such assessment is to:

-           Provide a learning experience in which students may develop and demonstrate a range of abilities.

-           Enable the lecturer to measure the achievement of students against both the learning outcomes and assessment criteria in the general academic milieu of the region.

-           Provide a means of monitoring student progress, identifying student strengths and diagnosing specific weaknesses, with a view to initiating procedures to remedy weaknesses and maximize student achievement.


Assessment Procedures

The assessment for each module is definitively specified in the module descriptor. During the first week of each new semester, students will receive a module descriptor for each module in which they are registered. Each module descriptor will provide adequate details of each assessment item, including due dates, the weighting of each task in the calculation of the final grade, and any component that must be completed at a required level in order to pass the module, even if a student has an overall passing grade. No subsequent change to the assessment tasks and schedule written in the module descriptor may be made except in writing with the unanimous approval of the lecturer concerned, the class and the Course Board. The Deputy Principal must also to be notified of the change.


Research Ethics Committee Approval

Where is a student is involved in Human Research, approval must be granted by the Research Ethics Committee. Students will be required to complete the application form and submit it to the Chair of the Research Ethics Committee. If all appropriate information is included with the application, a decision would normally be communicated within seven days of submitting the application form.


Submission of Assignments

All assignments are to be a student’s own work. All assignments are to be submitted through Turnitin. Where necessary, the printing of the assignments will be the responsibility of the institution.

             By submitting assignments to Turnitin students are asserting that the assignments are:

a.          understand the principles of academic honesty and

b.         the work submitted is their own work.


Deadlines for Assignments

It is the responsibility of each student to complete each assessment task by the deadlines set in each module descriptor. If illness or unexpected personal misfortune makes it impossible to complete an assessment task on time, it is the student's responsibility to contact the lecturer and Course Director immediately with any supporting documentation. Extensions for missed assessment tasks are at the discretion of the Course Director.

             No major assignment or major test is to be scheduled within the week prior to final examinations.


Late Submission of Assignments

Penalties for the late submission of assignments are as follows:

             a.          Up to one week late:

Assessment grade reduced by 10% of the assigned grade.

             b.         Between one week and the end of examinations:

Assessment grade reduced by 10% of the assigned grade AND capped at C-.

             c.          After the end of the semester:

Module result capped at C- AND counted as a supplementary.



Practicum Assessment

After the students have fulfilled the requirements of the Practicum, a grade of Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory will be awarded. However, to ensure the integration of theory and practice, some modules will require assessments to be completed as part of the practicum.


Examination Procedures

Examinations will normally be scheduled during Week 15 of the semester. The Academic Office will publish a Provisional Examination Timetable. Within five (5) days from the time of publication of the Provisional Examination Timetable, the student is responsible to check the timetable for any problems and advise the Academic Office in writing. The Academic Office examines all appeals sympathetically, but reserves the right to set times and venues according to the contingencies of the examination period. Once the final timetable has been published, a student can no longer appeal on any aspect of the timetable.


Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the use of someone else’s ideas or words as if they were one’s own. In essays and assignments the following should be acknowledged: the source of all quotations; all material paraphrased or summarised from other sources; factual information not commonly known and accepted in the discipline under study; a line of thinking borrowed from someone else; tables, diagrams, maps and illustrations derived from other sources. Sources should be referenced or footnoted in the style recommended for the module to which the assignment relates. In addition all sources used in an essay or assignment should be listed in a bibliography. Any of the following counts as plagiarism, unless there is a full acknowledgement of the debt to the original source:

a.          Direct duplication in any assignment or publication, by copying another person's work or allowing it to be copied, whether from a book, article, web site, another student's assignment, or any other source.

b.         Paraphrasing another person's work closely, with minor changes in language, but with the essential meaning, form and/or progression of ideas maintained

c.          Piecing together sections of the work of others into a new whole

d.         Submitting one's own work when it has already been submitted for assessment purposes in another module

e.         Producing assignments in conjunction with another person when independent work is required.

Fulton recognises that plagiarism is a serious academic issue. The following policy, most notably the tariffs (points), link to the plagiarism percentages highlighted in students’ assignments by the Turnitin program.

Procedures

The following procedures will apply:

-           Students will submit all assignments through Turnitin. On submission, students will see Turnitin’s cumulative percentage of similarity.

-           All lecturers will view class lists showing Turnitin results for an assignment they have marked, and will bring the list to the Course Board.

-           The Course Board will view the results and decide what action to take based on points accrued as detailed in the tables below.

-           Plagiarism offences will be recorded in students’ records in the department and will also be forwarded to the Academic Office.

Actions taken by departments on plagiarism according to the policy below will also be reported to the Academic Committee.

Criteria for Determining Penalties

The following five criteria will be used to determine the penalty for instances of plagiarism. Points will be awarded in the light of the following categories. The sum of these points will determine the outcome. These outcomes range from resubmission of an assignment to termination of academic study. However, no action is required if the cumulative Turnitin result is less than 15% as long as individual sources are less than 3%.

A.Previous Occurrences

Points

1st Time

100

2nd Time

150

3rd + Time

200

B.Amount/extent

Points

Below 15%*

The plagiarism is 3% or more from one or more individual sources OR

As above, but with *critical aspects plagiarised

80


105

15-29%

The plagiarism is 3% or more from one or more individual sources OR

As above, but with *critical aspects plagiarised

105



130

30-49%

The plagiarism is 3% or more from one or more individual sources OR

As above, but with *critical aspects plagiarised

130


160

50% +

The plagiarism is 3% or more from one or more individual sources

160

Whole assignment plagiarised

225

C.Level

Points

4Foundation

50

5Year 1

70

6Year 2

115

7Year 3

140

8Postgraduate

165

D.Value of Assignment

Points

Standarda research paper

30

Largea report worth 50% of the grade

a final year dissertation

60

E.Additional Characteristics

Points

Evidence of a deliberate attempt to disguise plagiarism e.g.:

-Just a few words are changed

-References are slightly altered


40


Penalties

Summative Work

Penalties will be awarded as outlined below.

1.         A formal warning will always be given.

2.         Warnings will be recorded in students’ files and will contribute to any further plagiarism issues as outlined in the History table.

Points

Penalties (one will be selected)

260 – 329

No further action beyond a formal warning

Assignment awarded 0% - resubmission required, with no penalty on mark

330 – 379

Assignment awarded 0% - resubmission required, with no penalty on mark

Assignment awarded 0% - resubmission required, but the mark cannot be more than 60% of the total possible mark

380 – 479

Assignment awarded 0% - resubmission required, but the mark cannot be more than 60% of the total possible mark

Assignment awarded 0% - but no opportunity to re-submit

480 – 524

Assignment awarded 0% - but no opportunity to re-submit

Module awarded 0% - a repeat is required

Module awarded 0% - no opportunity to repeat

525 – 559

Module awarded 0% - a repeat is required

Module awarded 0% - no opportunity to repeat

Award classification reduced (e.g. Distinction à Merit)

Qualification reduced (e.g. Honours à no Honours)

Expelled from institution, but credits retained

Expelled from institution, but credits withdrawn

560 +

Module awarded 0% - no opportunity to repeat, and credit lost

Award classification reduced

Qualification reduced

Expelled from institution, but credits retained

Expelled from institution, but credits withdrawn


Formative Work

Formative work in which plagiarism is identified will be judged by the above points system. However, the work will not be penalised, but the student will be issued a formal warning which will then be recorded in the student’s file.


Grades

Grades will be assigned using the following criteria. These criteria will be reflected in mark schemes and assessment feedback. In some cases, the schemes may be adapted for different types of assessment, such as examination answers, oral presentations and demonstrations.

Percent

Grade

Grade Points

Description

85+%

A

Distinction

4.00

Work that is characterised by ALL of the following criteria:

FOCUS - Acute and relevant focus on the task set

BREADTH - Excellent awareness of wider philosophical dimensions of subject

READING - wide and thorough reading

CRITICAL THINKING - analytical and critical appreciation

ANALYSIS - subtle and perceptive analysis

PROBLEM SOLVING - ability to understand and solve problems

ARGUMENT - cogent and structured argument

ORIGINALITY - subtlety and or originality

EXPRESSION - fluent writing and clarity of expression

PRESENTATION - presentation to a high scholarly standard

REFERENCING - an argument which is fully documented and well referenced.

80-84%

A-

Distinction

3.67

Work that is characterised by MOST of the following criteria:

FOCUS - Acute and relevant focus on the task set

BREADTH - Excellent awareness of wider philosophical dimensions of subject

READING - wide and thorough reading

CRITICAL THINKING - analytical and critical appreciation

ANALYSIS - subtle and perceptive analysis

PROBLEM SOLVING - ability to understand and solve problems

ARGUMENT - cogent and structured argument

ORIGINALITY - subtlety and or originality

EXPRESSION - fluent writing and clarity of expression

PRESENTATION - presentation to a high scholarly standard

REFERENCING - an argument which is fully documented and well referenced.

75-79%

B+

Merit

3.33

Work that is characterised by ALL of the following criteria:

FOCUS - Sound focus on task set

BREADTH - sound awareness of wider philosophical dimensions of subject

READING - thorough reading and preparation

CRITICAL THINKING - some critical thinking

ANALYSIS - thoughtful analysis

PROBLEM SOLVING - ability to understand and solve problems

ARGUMENT - well developed and structure argument

ORIGINALITY - some original thinking

EXPRESSION - coherent writing

PRESENTATION - clear and careful presentation

REFERENCING - well documented and referenced.

70-74%

B

Merit

3.00

Work that is characterised by MOST of the following criteria:

FOCUS - Sound focus on task set

BREADTH - sound awareness of wider philosophical dimensions of subject

READING - thorough reading and preparation

CRITICAL THINKING - some critical thinking

ANALYSIS - thoughtful analysis

PROBLEM SOLVING - ability to understand and solve problems

ARGUMENT - well developed and structure argument

ORIGINALITY - some original thinking

EXPRESSION - coherent writing

PRESENTATION - clear and careful presentation

REFERENCING - well documented and referenced

65-69%

B-

2.67

Work that is characterised by ALL of the following criteria:

FOCUS - Focus on the task set

BREADTH - some awareness of wider philosophical dimensions of subject

READING - range of reading

CRITICAL THINKING - limited critical thinking

ANALYSIS - measure of analysis

PROBLEM SOLVING - adequate ability to identify and solve problems

ARGUMENT - solid level of argument, though not always relevant

ORGINALITY - some attempt at original thinking

EXPRESSION - satisfactory written style

PRESENTATION - sound presentation

REFERENCING - with limited use of examples or references

60-64%

C+

2.33

Work that is characterised by MOST of the following criteria:

FOCUS - Focus on the task set

BREADTH - some awareness of wider philosophical dimensions of subject

READING - range of reading

CRITICAL THINKING - limited critical thinking

ANALYSIS - measure of analysis

PROBLEM SOLVING - adequate ability to identify and solve problems

ARGUMENT - solid level of argument, though not always relevant

ORGINALITY - some attempt at original thinking

EXPRESSION - satisfactory written style

PRESENTATION - sound presentation

REFERENCING - with limited use of examples or references

50 - 59%

C

2.00

Work that is characterised by ALL of the following criteria:

FOCUS - discernable focus on the task set

BREADTH - no or hardly any awareness of wider philosophical dimensions of the subject

READING - limited range of reading

CRITICAL THINKING - no or hardly any critical thinking

ANALYSIS - descriptive work

PROBLEM SOLVING - some attempt at identifying and solving problems

ARGUMENT - an argument which lacks structure and/or relevance

ORIGINALITY - no or hardly any original thinking

EXPRESSION - need for attention to writing

PRESENTATION - need for attention to presentation

REFERENCING - some references and examples

45-49%

C-

Fail

- but allowed to continue

1.67

Work that is characterised by MOST of the following criteria:

FOCUS - discernable focus on the task set

BREADTH - no or hardly any awareness of wider philosophical dimensions of the subject

READING - limited range of reading

CRITICAL THINKING - no or hardly any critical thinking

ANALYSIS - descriptive work

PROBLEM SOLVING - some attempt at identifying and solving problems

ARGUMENT - an argument which lacks structure and/or relevance

ORIGINALITY - no or hardly any original thinking

EXPRESSION - need for attention to writing

PRESENTATION - need for attention to presentation

REFERENCING - some references and examples

40-44%

D+

Fail

- but may be eligible for a supple-mentary. See Supple

mentary Policy.

1.33

Work that is characterised by SOME of the following criteria:

FOCUS - discernable focus on the task set

BREADTH - no or hardly any awareness of wider philosophical dimensions of the subject

READING - limited range of reading

CRITICAL THINKING - no or hardly any critical thinking

ANALYSIS - descriptive work

PROBLEM SOLVING - some attempt at identifying and solving problems

ARGUMENT - an argument which lacks structure and/or relevance

ORIGINALITY - no or hardly any original thinking

EXPRESSION - need for attention to writing

PRESENTATION - need for attention to presentation

REFERENCING - some references and examples

0-39%

F

Fail

0

Unacceptable and unsatisfactory work characterised by the following:

FOCUS - little or no focus on the task set which may be extremely brief

BREADTH - poor knowledge and understanding of the subject

READING - insufficient reading

CRITICAL THINKING - no or hardly any critical thinking

ANALYSIS - descriptive work

PROBLEM SOLVING - lack of ability to identify and solve problems

ARGUMENT - no or hardly any argument

ORIGINALITY - no or hardly any original thinking

PRESENTATION - poor presentation

EXPRESSION - poor expression making the answer barely intelligible

REFERENCING - no or hardly an references or examples

Grading Process

The following process applies to the grading of all assessments.

Initial Grading

The lecturer (first marker) is responsible for assessing all the work and assigning a grade according to the criteria. This work is then handed to the Internal Examiner (second marker) appointed by the Course Board.

Internal Moderation

Samples of all assessments graded by the first marker are internally moderated by the second marker. The grade recommended to the Examination Board will be agreed in a discussion between the first and second marker. Should questions arise in this process from the sampling of the assessment, the complete set of assessments for that module will be remarked. If agreement is not reached between the first marker and the second marker, a third marker will be appointed and their decision is binding.

Initial Examination Board

After the consultation between the first and second marker, the lecturer is responsible for preparing and submitting marks to the Course Director for the initial Examination Board. After their review, the assessments are then submitted to the External Examiner for their evaluation.

External Moderation

Samples of all graded assessments at the level of the award are externally moderated by an External Examiner appointed by Fulton. These examiners are usually experienced academics from another institution. They are appointed for a four-year term and replaced at the end of their term. These Examiners review the assessments and express an opinion on the standard of the work.

Examination Boards

The Examination Board, consisting of the faculty members of the department, teaching faculty in any module taught for the department and an External Examiner appointed by the Academic Board, receives the report of the External Examiner and confirms the grades. Special attention to any marginal grades. The overall performance of each student is also reviewed and recommendations made to the Academic Committee.

Student Transcripts

Grades confirmed by the Examination Board and endorsed by the Academic Committee are then processed by the Academic Registry. Students receive a transcript of their results. No transcripts will be issued where fees are still outstanding. The College reserves the right to release transcripts to a student's sponsor(s), parents and to potential employers.


Special Circumstances

Incomplete Grades and Deferred Examinations

If a student misses a final exam because of illness or unexpected personal misfortune, they may apply to the Academic Registrar for a grade of I "Incomplete". This application form must be submitted in writing and with supporting documentation within twenty-four hours of the exam. The Academic Committee will make a decision as to the validity of the application, as to what supplementary assessment task(s) the student needs to do to complete the module. A fee of $50 may be charged for a deferred examination. All outstanding assessment tasks in any module for which an incomplete grade has been recorded must be completed before the beginning of the next semester, when the Academic Registrar automatically converts any outstanding grade of I "Incomplete" to a grade of F "Fail".


Aegrotat, Compassionate, and Restricted Pass

If a student misses a final exam because of illness or unexpected personal misfortune, they may apply to the Academic Registrar for an Aegrotat Pass. An application form must be submitted in writing and with supporting documentation within twenty-four hours of the exam. The Academic Committee will make a decision as to the validity of the application.

             Students who are prevented from sitting the final examination by exceptional circumstances beyond their control; and other than their own illness or injury, or who consider that their performance in the examination will be seriously impaired by the same circumstances may apply for a Compassionate Pass. A compassionate pass is given with the approval of Academic Committee under the same conditions as those listed under Application for Aegrotat Pass above. In considering applications for a Compassionate Pass, it will be permissible to take into consideration the effect of any exceptional circumstance beyond the control of the student other than the student’s own illness or injury or the student’s performance during the semester.

             A Restricted Pass may, on the recommendation of the Head of Department, Exam Boards or Deputy Principal be awarded to a potential graduating student who has passed in their final year, all but one of the prescribed modules. In accordance, a restricted pass:

-           shall be awarded to a student in a module only if the total marks for that module are five marks less than the pass mark

-           shall not normally be awarded in retrospect

-           shall be awarded once to a student who is enrolled in a program of study with more than twenty modules

Students are required to submit an application for a restricted pass within three working days after the release of end of semester results.


Progression Rules

Normally at least 75% of modules must be successfully completed for a student to progress to the next level. Only in exceptional circumstances, will the Academic Committee approve a student to take modules out of sequence. Prerequisites, where applicable, are specifically stated in the module synopses section of this Bulletin.

             Should a student fail two or more modules in any semester, the whole semester will need to be repeated. This may require a period of academic suspension until the semester is offered again. When a semester is repeated, the record of the repeated semester replaces the record of the semester in which two failures occurred. However, if only a module is repeated, the previous record remains.


Supplementary Assessment Policy

When a student has a grade of D+ (40%-44% inclusive), the Academic Committee, upon recommendation of the Examination Board, may approve a supplementary assessment. The nature the supplementary assessment shall be determined by the Examination Board in consultation with the module lecturer according to approved discipline-specific guidelines. Supplementary assessments will normally

-           be completed during the vacation period

-           be granted in only one module in a given semester

-           be granted if the change of grade to a ‘C-‘ will enable the student to progress

-           not be offered if more than 30 credit points, (2 modules), have been failed in the semester

-           be granted only twice in the first two years of a program

-           be granted only three times in a three-year study program

A fee of $FJD50 will be charged for a supplementary assessment. Upon the successful completion of the supplementary assessment the “D+” grade will be converted to a “C-“ grade. If not successful, the “D+” reverts to an “F” grade.


Modules Failed Twice

A student who fails a module twice will not normally be allowed to re-enrol for the module. A student must appeal to the Academic Committee through the relevant Head of Department for approval to attempt a module a third time.


Academic Probation

Where a student falls below the required level in the first semester of their enrolment, they will be put on academic probation. A report indicating that a student has been placed on Academic Probation is normally sent to his/her guardian and/or sponsors. Students on academic probation must:

-           Sign an academic agreement noting the conditions for continuing in their course

-           Seek academic counseling from the Lecturer/Course Director/Head of Department

-           Reduce extracurricular activities

-           Attend at least ninety percent of all classes in each module

-           Provide a status report to the Course Director in which they are studying by the end of week nine

If this continues to a consecutive semester, they will receive an academic suspension.


Academic Suspension

A student will normally be academically suspended when they have

-           failed to improve when placed under Academic Probation OR

-           failed two or more modules in a given semester OR

-           a GPA below 1.34 in a given semester.

             Students under academic suspension will normally be eligible to reenter the program the next time the modules are offered.


Academic Termination

Students are normally terminated from their course of study if one or more of the following is true:

-           they fail the same required module twice

-           they exhibit wilful defiance or neglect during their practicum

-           they have a semester GPA below the required level for more than two consecutive semesters

-           their CGPA remains below the required level for more than two consecutive semesters

-           they attain a CGPA of less than 1.34 in any given year


ACADEMIC CREDIT REGULATIONS

A student usually earns credit for each module at Fulton College by securing a passing grade in that module. However, they may receive credit in one of three other ways:

-           by modules previously studied at Fulton College

-           by studies completed at other approved tertiary institutions

-           by prior experiential learning or

-           by successfully passing a challenge exam.


Credits from Previous Study at Fulton College

On the advice of a student's Course Director to the Registrar, credits may be given for specific modules in current Fulton courses on the basis of study previously undertaken in past years. Credit will be given on the basis of equivalence to Learning Outcomes and only for modules with at least a C- (45%).

             Unless a student is receiving credit for all subjects previously studied at Fulton College, a new course plan will normally be started listing only those subjects for which credit is being given. Credit will be given for a transferred subject but no grade. The cumulative GPA calculation will recommence and later grades added as they are earned.


Credits from Study at Other Approved Tertiary Institutions

Students seeking advanced standing on the basis of studies completed at other approved tertiary institutions should submit full official transcripts to the Academic Registrar, with a copy of module descriptions and course information, so that credit point equivalents can be established. Credit will be given on the basis of equivalence to Learning Outcomes and only for modules with at least a C- (45%). Credit will be given on the advice of the student's Course Director, to the Registrar.

             Normally in a three-year program, only 50% of a program would be cross-credited. In special circumstances the Academic Committee may approve 67% of a program. However, in all cases, a minimum of 120 credits must be attained at Fulton.

             The Course Board in which a student's course is based makes a decision at the end of the student's first semester in residence at Fulton College as to whether the credits given should be confirmed or annulled. However, transfer credits remain provisional until a student graduates from Fulton College. This fact may have important ramifications for a student's study program. For example, the school responsible for teaching a module for which credit has been given may still annul that credit at a later date, if it decides that the student is exhibiting a deficiency in the foundation that the module is intended to provide.


Credits from Prior Experiential Learning

Students seeking advanced standing on the basis of prior experiential learning should submit a portfolio of work supporting an application. Credit will be given on the basis of equivalence to Learning Outcomes. Credit will be given on the advice of the student's Course Director, to the Registrar.


Credits from Challenge Examinations

If a student believes that they have already achieved mastery over the content of a particular module, policy permits him/her to apply to sit a challenge exam. The student must notify the Course Director offering the module in writing of their intention to sit a challenge exam by the beginning of the second week of semester classes, or by the opening of business on the third day of an intensive session. A receipt for the non-refundable twenty –five dollars marking fee must be submitted with the request. The Course Director will organise the setting, timing, supervision, and marking of the challenge exam, which must be sat before the beginning of the third week of semester classes, or before the beginning of the second week of classes in an intensive module session. The pass mark for a challenge exam is set at fifty percent. If a student passes a challenge exam, they will receive a grade of CH "Challenge Credit". This grade has no value in terms of calculating a student's grade point average.


GRADUATION POLICIES AND REGULATIONS

Requirements for Graduation

In order for students to graduate the following four requirements need to be met:

Academic Requirements

Candidates for graduation must have completed and passed all required modules and have achieved the minimum 2.00 Cumulative Major Grade Point Average.

Financial Requirements

To graduate, a student must make satisfactory arrangements to settle his/her financial obligations. Testamurs will not be issued until fees are fully paid.

Character Requirements

Candidates for graduation must satisfy the Faculty that they have a character in keeping with the ideals of the College as set out in the Student Handbook

Calendar Requirements

Students enrolled in a particular course may expect to be graduated from that course in its original form provided that they are in continuous attendance for the full period of the course. If a student’s attendance is broken by a period of one academic year or more, they will be expected to meet the course requirements of the Calendar under which they re-enters the college.

             A student in continuous attendance, whose course, because of failures or a reduced study load, extends beyond the minimum time for completion of the course, must meet the same graduation requirements as expected from students graduating with them in the minimum time.


Academic Excellence

The testamur of a degree graduate with a cumulative GPA of at least 3.66 will state that they have graduated with Distinction. The testamur of a degree graduate with a cumulative GPA between 3.00 and 3.66 will state that they have has graduated with Merit.


Graduation Class

The Graduation Class is formed early in the second semester. All graduating students are expected to attend class meetings and participate in graduation practices and preparations. A student on academic probation is not eligible to join the graduation class.


Graduation in Absentia

A graduand who wishes to graduate in absentia is required to request permission in writing from the Academic Board.


Academic Regalia

Each graduate is required to wear the specified academic regalia during graduation ceremonies, as determined by the Academic Board. (Robes and sashes are available on hire from the College and the cost of this hire is included in each student’s graduation fee)

Award

Robe

Sash Colour

Bachelor of Business [Accounting & Management]

Bachelor of Business [Information Systems]

Bachelor of Business [Marketing]

Diploma in Business [Accounting & Management]

Diploma in Business [Information Systems]

Diploma in Business [Marketing]

Black

Black

Black

Blue

Blue

Blue

Crimson

Tangerine

Cranberry

Crimson with Sky-Blue Trim

Tangerine with Sky-Blue Trim

Cranberry with Sky-Blue Trim

Bachelor of Education Hons [Primary]

Postgraduate Diploma in Education

Bachelor of Education [Primary]

Bachelor of Education [Early Childhood]

Graduate Dip in Adventist Education

                                    Diploma in Education [Primary]

Diploma in Education [Early Childhood]

Black

Black

Black

Black

Black

Blue

Blue

Turquoise with Gold Trim

Turquoise with Gold Trim

Turquoise

Royal Blue

Turquoise with Silver Trim

Turquoise with Sky-Blue Trim

Royal Blue with Sky-Blue Trim

Bachelor of Theology Hons

Postgraduate Diploma in Theology

Bachelor of Theology

Graduate Diploma in Adventist Studies

Graduate Diploma in Theology

Diploma in Theology

Black

Black

Black

Black

Black

Blue

Purple with Gold Trim

Purple with Gold Trim

Purple

Purple with White Trim

Purple with Silver Trim

Purple with Sky-Blue Trim


Each year’s Graduation Class chooses their Class Colours, which are traditionally worn in the form of a rosette pinned to the left shoulder of the graduation robe.


Transcripts

On completing a course, a student is entitled to an original transcript. Additional transcripts will cost $10.00. A partial transcript for current students is available upon receipt of a $5.00 fee. Transcripts are released without correction or alteration and with the stamp and signature. A minimum of one week should normally be allowed for the issuance of a transcript.


Reissuing of Testamur

Fulton College will not issue a second testamur in the event the original is lost or damaged. Instead, the Registrar will issue a letter of confirmation stating that the qualification studied was successfully completed.


QUALITY ASSURANCE POLICY & PROCESS

Policy

Definitions

Quality is a complex, multi-dimensional and often subjective concept as it is most often determined by different stakeholders under usually different circumstances. In assuring the quality of education and training activities, ‘quality’ is applied and understood to mean any of ‘excellence’, ‘fit for purpose’, ‘continuous improvement’, ‘achieving thresholds’, and ‘value for money’. In the context of Pacific education and training, all of these meanings are assumed and will predominantly be both ‘fit for purpose’(or fitness of purpose) and for ‘continuous improvement’.”

Quality Assurance is known as the mechanisms and processes utilised to ensure that quality is implemented and embedded throughout the institution.

Monitoring is the process of seeking evidence to answer questions about the effectiveness of the institution.

Evaluating is analysing and assessing the evidence collected through the monitoring process.

Reviewing reports the actions taken in the light of the evaluation.


Purpose

The purpose of internal quality assurance is to:

          -           Monitor the operation and performance of all aspects of the institution

          -           Seek regular and constructive feedback from key stakeholders

          -           Ensure consistency throughout the institution.

          -           Share good practice

          -           Evaluate the data collected as part of the monitoring operation

          -           Recognise areas of strength

          -           Identify areas for improvement

          -           Propose strategies for using strengths to improve the operation and performance of the institution

          -           Allocate resources in the most effective way to maximise their use

          -           Report to the stakeholders on the actions implemented as a result of the monitoring, evaluation and review processes


Principles

          -           All members of the institution are involved in the process of quality assurance, including the monitoring, evaluation and review of the operations.

          -           Monitoring, evaluation and review is dependent on self-critical reflective practice.

          -           Monitoring, evaluation and review should operate in a climate of mutual trust, respect, support and professionalism.


Scope of Quality Assurance

The scope of Fulton’s quality assurance policy includes all aspects of the educational process throughout the whole of the student life cycle - enquirer applicant, enrolled student, progressing student, graduate and alumni. As noted in the following diagram, it focuses on seven key areas of institutional life:

          -           Statistics documenting the academic life cycle

          -           Development and implementation of the curriculum

          -           Selection and management of faculty

          -           Teaching and learning process

          -           Resources for learning

          -           Institutional Facilities and

          -           Student support services.

In each of these categories, a range of evidence is sourced to provide input into the cycle of continuous improvement.


Sources of Data

The following sources, as summarised in the above diagram, will provide the evidence on which the institution will critically reflect to provide insights into the quality of the institutional processes and action plans to provide continual improvement.

1.      Academic Statistics

          -           Enrolment data: Qualification; Age; Gender; Ethnicity; Religion; Disability; Scholarships

          -           Progression data: Progression; Withdrawals; Repeats; Terminations; Appeals

           -           Graduate data: Graduates; Classifications; Destination

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2.      Curriculum

           -           Internal Curriculum Design: Professional Standards; Employer Expectations; and Benchmarking

          -           Curriculum Advisory Committees: Professionals; Employers; External Moderators; Recent Graduates; and Students

          -           Graduate Survey

          -           External Reports

          -           Accreditation Reports

3.      Faculty

          -           Appointment: Qualifications; Experience; and Ethos

          -           Student Survey:

          -           Graduate Survey:

          -           Faculty Report: Professional Contribution; Peer Review; Research

          -           Accreditation Reports

4.      Learning & Teaching

          -           Student Survey

          -           Graduate Survey

          -           External Reports

          -           Accreditation Reports

5.      Learning Resources - Educational & Technological

          -           Student Survey

          -           Graduate Survey

          -           Accreditation Reports

6.      Facilities - Infrastructure & Maintenance

          -           Student Survey

          -           Graduate Survey

          -           Faculty/Staff Survey

          -           Accreditation Reports

7.      Support Services - Administration, Finance, Student Services (Spiritual/Social/Residential /Food Services)

          -           Student Survey

          -           Graduate Survey

          -           Faculty/Staff Survey

          -           Accreditation Reports


Process

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The central tool to Fulton’s process of quality assurance is the Institutional Annual Report. The Institutional Annual Report comprises Departmental Annual Reports.

Data Collection

As noted the second diagram, these reports are based on data collected from the following eight sources:

          1.         Prior recommendations

          2.         Statistics

          3.         Accreditation reports

          4.         External Moderator reports

          5.         Faculty/Staff reports

          6.         Graduate surveys

          7.         Student Evaluation of Teaching & Learning

          8.         Student and Faculty surveys of support services


The type of data collected from these sources is as follows:

          1.         Prior Recommendations

Progress on previous action plans

Feedback from Quality Assurance Committee

New Action Plan

          2.         Academic Statistics

Enrolment

Progression

Graduate

          3.         Accreditation Reports

AAA

FHEC

SPATS

          4.         External Report

Comparability of standards

Good practice

Concerns and recommendations

          5.         Faculty Report

Professional Development

Professional Contribution

Peer Review

Research & publications

          6.         Graduate Survey

Satisfaction - Academic, Spiritual, Cocurricular

Employment

Suggestions

          7.         Student Survey

Academic

                       -           Teaching Quality

                       -           Learning Resources

                       -           Assessment & feedback to students

                       -           Student support & guidance

                       -           Faith & Learning

                       -           Context

                       -           Suggestions

Support

                       -           Spiritual programs

                       -           Social programs

                       -           Finance - accuracy; efficiency

                       -           Technology

                       -           Food Services

                       -           Residential

                       -           Suggestions

          8.         Faculty/Staff Survey


Data Analysis & Strategies

Once this data is collected and processed, it is assessed and evaluated by employees within each part of the institution. As a result of such critical reflection, good practice is identified and commended, and actions plans proposed to address the challenges noted.

Institutional Annual Report

Each department’s annual report is then collated into an institutional report with management providing an overview of the quality issues within the institution.

External Review

The Institutional Report is then submitted to the Quality Assurance Subcommittee of the College Board and other appropriate external agencies. The report from the Quality Assurance Committee would cluster around four responses:

          -           Commendations

          -           Concerns

          -           Recommendations

          -           Requests

Response Loop

Fulton and the various departments would then consider the concerns, recommendations and requests of the External Review panels and formerly respond to them in the next Annual Report, outlining the actions taken to address the requests, responses to the recommendations and consideration given to the concerns.

Feedback Loop

In addition to the formal response to the External Review, Fulton would also communicate with its various stakeholders outlining actions taken as a result of the cycle of continual improvement. It is hoped that not only information is provided to the various stakeholders, but that all stakeholders are motivated to provide future responses as they have evidence that their input has been valued and used to make a difference.



APPEALS

Students have the right to appeal any decision. Details of the Appeals Policy is contained in the Student Handbook.


Academic Appeals

Students wishing to appeal against a grade are required to complete the Academic Appeals form (available from the Academic Office) within 14 days of the date of the official publication of results if one or more of the following conditions is deemed to apply:

a.      There is reason to believe that a material administrative error of any type has occurred.

b.      There is reason to believe that assessment of summative course work or examination has not been carried out in accordance with published guidelines.

c.       There is reason to believe that the student’s performance may have been adversely affected in any way which, although justifiably not documented to the Examination Board as provided for above, is nevertheless convincing to the Examination Board.

Appeals which challenge the academic judgment of the Examination Board cannot be entertained. However, where summative work has not been marked by an External Moderator, a student has the right to request their work be moderated. This will be done either externally or by an addition internal process beyond the normal internal moderation.

          When considering any appeal, the Examination Board must be quorate (50% plus one) and they must respond to any appeal within 14 days.


Appeals re Withdrawal from a Module or Academic Termination

When a student is required to withdraw from a module or is terminated from their course and from the College, the Academic Office respectively issues a notice of withdrawal or termination. In the notice, the student is informed of their right to appeal to the Academic Committee in writing within three days of delivery of the notice, providing the Academic Committee with any information that the student believes to be relevant to the appeal.

          If a student is not satisfied with the result of any initial appeal , or if the Course Director/Head of Department fails to respond within the allotted period, the College Appeal Policy and Process can be invoked. However, in the case of an Academic Appeal, this Appeals Process does not have the authority to change grades, but to require the institution to ensure that appropriate processes are followed in the determination of a grade. Such decision is always final.

PROGRAMS OF STUDY


CURRICULUM RATIONALE

Background

The Fiji Higher Education Promulgation came into effect in 2008. As a result of this the Fiji Higher Education Commission was established. Their mandate was to regulate the Higher Education sector through a process of accreditation of institutions and qualifications. Consequently, the Fiji Qualifications Framework was designed and launched in February 2012.

          Fulton was recognised by the Fiji Higher Education Commission in 2010. In 2012, Fulton was registered as a University College. This gave the institution provisional accreditation for its qualifications and requires it to submit documentation for qualification accreditation within 12 months. Consequently the College has worked through a process internally to ensure that the proposed curriculum to be submitted to the Fiji Higher Education in the next few months conforms with the requirements of the Fiji Qualifications Framework. This process has had the College consult professional standards of the various enterprises, research the programs of other institutions, dialogue with employers, professionals, and recent graduates. This internal work is reviewed by the Curriculum Advisory Committee prior to submission for endorsement to the College Board, other entities and the Fiji Higher Education Commission.


Focus on Learning Outcomes

One key aspect of the Fiji Qualification Frameworks is the emphasis on achieving learning outcomes. Concepts of measuring inputs such as entry levels and learning time is overshadowed by the need for students to demonstrate their mastery of the subject against the stated learning outcomes - both for the course and the individual component. Naturally there is a need to monitor the inputs and ensure that students are properly equipped for the study program, as well as have a notional understanding of the time it would take an average student to achieve the learning outcomes. However, the quality of an award is measured by the demonstration of the learning outcomes benchmarked against a framework of defined educational levels.

          In this outcomes-based approach, the academic viability of a program focuses on the suitability of the graduate for employment in the marketplace. Such an outcome focuses on the wholisitic development of the candidate including the professional development, personal qualities and spiritual formation, and not just the academic achievement. Fulton has generically profiled the graduate of an Honours degree as a competent professional who can resource other professionals due to their research interests or specialisation. The profile of a graduate of a Bachelor’s degree is a competent professional who can work in their own business or lead a team. The profile of a graduate from a Diploma is a member of a team working under the direction of a professional, while the profile of a graduate of a Certificate is an employee providing support to a team. Consequently, Fulton would typically recommend graduates of all Honours and Bachelors degree for employment in their field of study, as well as graduates with Diplomas in Business and Education [Early Childhood].

          The Curriculum Advisory Committees, appointed by the College comprise employers, practitioners, graduates, students and academics, to review the curriculum. The standards of the Fiji Higher Education Commission require such critical engagement as part of their accreditation of both institutions and qualifications. Some regional representation has been included as consideration also needs to be given to the developments occurring throughout the Pacific so that the curriculum can continue to be adapted to these changing circumstances.


Curriculum Design

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The curriculum design is modeled on current practice where there is a greater focus on integration, progression and depth. The Fiji Qualifications Framework typically defines an Honours degree as four years of study with at least 72 credits of the 480 credits at Level 8, a Bachelor’s degree as three years of study with at least 72 of the 360 credits being at Level 7, Diploma (or Advanced Diploma) as two years of HE study with at least 72 of the 240 credits being at Level 6 and a Certificate (or Diploma) as one year of HE study with at least 72 of the 120 credits at the level of the award.

          Fulton has chosen to divide each semester into four components for the Bachelor’s degree and two components for the Honours year. This means that the semester assessment word counts for each level of study are divided in four not five and final year degree students then benefit from writing more substantive assessments which will give them greater opportunity to develop thoughtful arguments.

          It also means that students need to complete the program in a structured approach ensuring that they have mastered each level (75% complete) prior to progression to a new level. This does require a rethink of scheduling subjects as students should take these in a sequence so that they can develop the necessary skills for higher order learning required in later subjects.

          Within the awards outlined underneath, Fulton plans to nest other awards. Within the Bachelor Honours degree is a degree and diploma. There is also room within this framework for awarding a Graduate Certificates and Diplomas and Postgraduate Certificates and Diplomas. Consequently, Fulton is proposing to offer a Graduate Diploma in Theology enabling mature students with an existing degree to have an abridged theological undergraduate experience in one or two years. Typically any pastoral appointment would expect the Graduate Diploma to be followed by a Postgraduate Diploma enabling a minimum of two years of pastoral formation. Graduates from these programs are often employed first as they demonstrate a combination of pastoral/theological education and a proven record of life skills and maturity from their earlier education and career. Fulton is also proposing a Graduate Diploma in Adventist Education to complement someone’s existing educational qualification.


Integration of Theory & Practice

          Theoretical and placement learning (practicum) need to be designed to complement each other. Consequently each practical component reflects the theoretical focus of the preceding semester. Assessment of the practical education (not just experience) includes assignments which apply, critique (including self-critique) or reflect on the theory already taught. Consequently they do not have credit attached to them, although they do provide opportunities to demonstrate competence in real life for the skills taught throughout the semester.

          Typically, first year students are exposed to a range of professional experiences concurrent with their studies. Second and third year students are immersed in five week block field placements scheduled during the mid-year break. These block field placements are directly connected to theoretical components taught prior to the placement. Some modules will also include an assessment which will enable the student to apply the theory and critically reflect on the application of such theory in professional practice.


Focus Beyond

Fulton is also exploring ways in which its programs can contribute to the wider Church constituency and not just the professionals employed by the Church. The Graduate Diploma in Adventist Studies, will enrich the personal lives of Church members and provide them with added skills to serve in their various churches.


Core Curriculum

Fulton has five key components embedded across the proposed degree curriculum. Four of these are focused on embedding Adventist values: Life & Teachings of Jesus; Essentials of the Christian Faith; Applied Christian Ethics; and Health and Lifetsyle. Most of these Adventist values have been present in the curriculum in some form or another. This approach is to intentionally embed these values across the curriculum and provide an Adventist approach to the education offered at Fulton.

          The other, Academic Research and Writing, is to ensure a consistent quality of expression in the professional work of the graduate.



Co-curricular Competencies

In addition to the core curriculum, Fulton is requiring all students to demonstrate various competencies. Based on the assumption that the general education requirements are covered in the student’s prior learning (Fm 7, Foundation, Life-Skills), Fulton needs to ensure that students have these skills at the required competency. Should students have not achieved a satisfactory pass in these competencies by the end of the first semester, classes in these competencies will be offered during the mid-year break of the first year of study.

          Computer Skills                            All programs

          Literacy & Numeracy                  All programs

          Vernacular (Fijian, Hindi etc)     Education & Theology

          Adventist Doctrines                     Theology

Research is an integral part of the Honours program. It is critical that today’s graduates can develop the skill of exegeting the text and context as well as reflecting critically on personal and professional practice in an objective scholarly manner so that the cycle of continuous improvement is intentionally embedded in professional practice.

BACHELOR OF BUSINESS [Accounting & Management]

The program is primarily designed to equip graduates with the skills and expertise relevant to an accountant and a manager. It provides a sequential series of studies in accounting practices and principles with a blend of economics and management, including approaches to national and international management. Graduates will have the ability to work as accountants, having completed some essential components for professional registration, as well as have a foundation for future studies.

 

A.      Graduate Profile

Graduates will be able to:

Components

Learning Outcomes

Accounting Studies

Analyze and audit any accounting transaction.

Critique accounting practices to ensure that proper financial reporting and good governance are practiced.

Critically apply different approaches and techniques to all aspects of accounting including facilitating the decision making process.

Management Studies

Lead people and organizations through efficient and effective management processes and practices.

Apply lively imagination to the application of management principles and practices in private, national and international contexts.

Religious & Philosophical Studies

Sympathetically appraise the Seventh-day Adventist faith and demonstrate the responsibilities of having such a faith in their professional and personal life.

Complementary Studies

Utilize ethical research methods and appropriate communication skills in presentations and publications

Demonstrate a healthy lifestyle which contributes to personal and community health.

 

B.      Entry Requirements

 Pass in FSF7E or its equivalent including a pass in Accounting OR

PSSC result under 11 including a pass in Accounting

Pass in Foundation Studies [Business]

A pass in the Mature Age examination for those over the age of 22 yrs in the year of entry.

 

C.      Co-curricular Competencies

Competencies

 

Computer Skills

Students will demonstrate general knowledge from the computer systems, use software and hardware, file management, keyboarding and basic word processing skills. This is an elementary level for general computer applications, word processing, spreadsheets and power point presentations.

Literacy

Students will be required to achieve a Level 1 (a minimum of 70% in Entry Level 3) in the Future School Literacy software.

Numeracy

Students will required to achieve a Level 1 (a minimum of 70% in Entry Level 3) in the Future School Literacy software.

 

 

D.      Sequence

Bachelor of Business [Accounting & Management]

Level

 

Credits

 

Sem

 

Accounting Studies

Management Studies

Religious & Philosophical Studies

Complementary Studies

7

360

 

46%

33%

13%

13%

5

60

1

BAASS101

Quantitative Mathematics

BAGS101

Intro to Management

 

BACS101

Academic Research & Writing

 

 

 

BACS102

Computer Principles

 

60

2

BAAS102

Intro to Financial Statements

BAGS102

Business Communication

BARS101

Essentials of Christian Faith

 

BAAS103

Micro Economics

 

 

 

6

60

1

BAAS201

Financial Accounting

BAGS201

Organisation & Management

 

 

BAAS202

Applied Accounting Software

BAGS202

International Marketing & Management

 

 

BAPR201 Financial Statements & Organisation Practicum

60

2

BAAS203

Accounting Theory & Application

BAGS203

Small Business & Entrepreneurship

BARS201

Life & Teachings of Jesus

BACS201

Health & Lifestyle

7

60

1

BAAS301

Management Accounting

BAGS301

Commercial Law

 

 

BAAS302

Auditing

 

 

 

BAAS303

Taxation Law & Practice

 

 

 

BAPR301 Auditing Practicum

60

2

BAAS304

Corporate Accounting

BAGS302

Human Resource Knowledge & Management

BARS301

Applied Christian Ethics

 

BAAS305

Macro Economics

 

 

 

 

E.       Module Learning Outcomes

Component 1:Accounting Studies

 

 

No

Unit ID Number

Unit Standard/Learning Outcome

Lev

Cred

1

BAAS 101

Quantitative Mathematics

Manipulate algebraic expressions to solve business problems.

5

15

Distinguish between simple interest and compound interest and their application in solving present and future values.

Demonstrate an understanding of the application of annuities to solve future and present values and periodic payments

Demonstrate an informed understanding and ability to compute interest and yield payments of bonds.

Convert and interpret budgeting, time value of contingent payments and life annuities to assist in business decision making. 

2

BAAS 102

Introduction to Financial Statements

Demonstrate a clear understanding on the completion of the accounting cycle to prepare financial statements used for financial reporting and decision making.

5

15

Account for the processes involved in the retail operations of inventory transactions, including the reporting of appropriate ledgers and special journals in an accounting system.

Demonstrate an understanding in the formation of partnerships, its operations and reporting.

Clearly distinguish between the different approaches and regulations used to account for major components of financial statements in terms of assets and liabilities.

3

BAAS 103

Micro Economics

Explain how economist goes about their work as social science and policy advisers.

5

15

Calculate the factors that influence the cross elasticity and income elasticity of demand.

Explain the sources and trends of economic inequality.

Identify the gains from international trade and its winners and losers

4

BAAS 201

Financial Accounting

Apply the principles encapsulated in the IASB’s “Framework for the Preparation and Presentation of Financial Reporting Statements” and International Financial Reporting Standards pertinent to financial accounting processes.

6

15

Employ fair value accounting as mandated by the International Financial Reporting Standards.

Account for revenues and expenses as mandated by the International Financial Reporting Standards.

Construct the necessary bookkeeping processes to report the various forms of financial business entities may employ.

Undertake the necessary calculations and book keeping procedures to comply with the International Financial Reporting Standards stipulated for accounting for employee benefits.

5

BAAS 202

Applied Accounting Software

Appropriately apply basic accounting principles in financial transactions.

6

15

Using the software, demonstrate an understanding of how to create new company accounts and update and maintain financial data and information.

Solve operational problems and assist in the running of a small business employing the accounting software.

6

BAAS 203

Accounting Theory & Application

Explain the nature of accounting theory and the means by which theories can be constructed.

6

15

Explain the forms of measurement used in accounting practice and their limitations.

Explain the nature of assets, liabilities and owners equity.

Compare public and private interest theories of regulation in the context of accounting.

Discuss the practical difficulties raised by the conceptualization and measurement of income.

Evaluate the impact that normative, positive, behavioral and critical accounting theories have on the understanding and development of accounting practice.

Explore the relationship between stakeholder and legitimacy theories.

Evaluate arguments in favor and against incorporating social and environmental accounting, within the scope of accounting.

7

BAAS 301

Management Accounting

Explain the nature of ‘management accounting’ and how it differs from ‘financial accounting’

7

15

Discuss the different nature of costs.

Apply indirect costs in relation to the different environments of the costing system

Discuss the nature and components of the manufacturing overhead costs.

Explain how the basic types of cost accounting systems work.

Differentiate between traditional and contemporary approaches to costing systems

Discuss how capital expenditure decisions are made and the role of management accounting information in that process.

8

BAAS 302 Auditing

Demonstrate an understanding of the development of auditing, the changing role of auditors and accountants and the standards of behavior expected of them.

7

15

Examine crucial evaluations and decisions associated with the process of audit planning highlighting key risk areas.

Explain the tests for various controls and design substantive procedures during the preliminary stages of an audit.

Critically apply the audit approach to specific transactions and balances in a financial statement in order to achieve a planned level of detection risk in the audit.

Demonstrate understanding on the completion of the fieldwork, evaluation of the findings and communication with the entity.

9

BAAS 303

Taxation Law & Practice

Demonstrate a significant knowledge and understanding of current taxation law in Fiji.

7

15

Demonstrate analytical and problem solving abilities within the framework of taxation law.

Apply current legal principles to address relevant legal issues.

Demonstrate written and oral communication skills, critical thinking and legal research skills.

10

BAAS 304

Corporate

Accounting

Critically apply the rules of recording transactions belonging to company formation, dividend and capital issues

7

15

Implement the accounting rules for recording schemes relating to the reduction of share capital in accordance with Companies Act of 1983

Account for tax loss transfers, capital gain, fringe benefits, revaluation and disposal of depreciable assets.

Differentiate the treatments applying to construction contracts, leases, research and development, and revenue recognition.

Articulate the accounting rules relating to liquidation and receivership.

Articulate the accounting rules for Consolidated Accounting for a 100% single subsidiary.

11

BAAS 305

Macro Economics

Explain economic growth and how potential GDP grows.

7

15

Explain theories of economic growth and policies to increase the growth rate.

Analyse the main schools of thought in macroeconomics today.

Discuss fiscal and monetary policy.

Component 2:Management Studies

 

 

1

BAGS 101

Introduction to Management

Discuss the values of applying good management principles

5

15

Recognize the internal and external factors that impact an organizations management.

Discuss the management functions of planning, organizing, leading staff and controlling.

Demonstrate analytical skills when managing organizations through changes and challenges.

2

BAGS 102

Business Communication

Discuss the fundamentals of achieving effective communication.

5

15

Demonstrate the ability to write accurate and convincing reports, proposals, letters, agendas and minutes.

Discuss the different types of documents needed when going for a job inteview.

3

BAGS 201

Organization & Management

Describe the importance of study organizational and behavior and management.

6

15

Compare and contrast different approaches to management and the relevance of these approaches in contemporary Pacific organisations.

Explore different approaches for organizations to show ethical responsibility to the society and community.

Evaluate the organization strategic plan and structure and determine the practice and the variables that best suits an organization.

4

BAGS 202

International & Marketing Management

Discuss the difference between traditional marketing and international marketing and why companies need to engage in international marketing and management

6

15

Determine the key frameworks, concepts and theories of internationally marketing and management and derive managerial skills.

Evaluate the different marketing process and strategies that a company can employ to reach its target market.

Discuss the use of internet as a marketing tool for doing business internationally.

5

BAGS 203

Small Business & Entrepreneurship

Assess the role of entrepreneurship in economic growth and development, and the opportunities for creative innovations as a means of sustainability.

6

15

Evaluate the options of doing business and developing strategies to capture those opportunities.

Apply the key management functions for a successful small business.

6

BAGS 301

Commercial Law

Demonstrate the ability to understand legal issues relating to any aspects of operation of a business.

7

15

Discuss the significance of legal treaty in commercial transaction and the menace that may emerge if agreements and contracts are breached.

Discuss the significance of legal treaty in commercial transaction and the menace that may emerge if agreements and contracts are breached.

Critique the different business entities, their legal constituent and the rights and liabilities linked to office holders and consumer protection.

Recognize the various legal obligations associated with financial operations of companies.

7

BAGS 302

Human Resource Knowledge & Management

Critique HR from a strategic perspective.

7

15

Evaluate the recruitment tools for securing effective employees and retaining them.

Analyse the leadership styles practiced by management in different levels of an organisation

Discuss strategies managers can utilise to proactively prevent conflict

Component 3:Religious & Philosophical Studies

 

 

1

BARS 101

Essentials of Christian Faith

Demonstrate an understanding of Adventist doctrines as biblically centered and rooted in Christ.

5

15

Illustrate how selected doctrines are still important in the 21st century.

Explain the Adventist view of selected controversial doctrines.

2

BARS 201

Life & Teaching of Jesus

Construct the historical, political and socio-cultural background to the four gospels and deduce implications for the ministry of Jesus.

6

15

Demonstrate an understanding of the context and content of the parables and miracles of Jesus.

Establish the connection of the gospel message to the daily growth of faith in the One whom the gospel proclaims.

Interpret a selected story, parable, or miracle of Jesus.

3

BARS 301

Applied Christian Ethics

Apply knowledge of Scripture and its principles and values in moral reasoning and decision making.

7

15

Evaluate major ethical issues and dilemmas from biblical, contemporary Christian and Seventh-day Adventist perspectives.

Formulate appropriate Christian ethical strategies for personal and professional development in the work place.

Demonstrate an understanding of key ethical concepts presented in the module.

Component 4:Complementary Studies

 

 

1

BACS 101

Academic Research & Writing

Demonstrate competence in a variety of types of academic writing.

5

15

Demonstrate competence in locating and making effective use of secondary research.

Generate and analyse a quality questionnaire for a tertiary assignment.

Demonstrate oral competency in the English language.

2

BACS 102

Computer Principles

Demonstrate an understanding of fundamental computer concepts and their applications in the real world

5

15

Demonstrate the ability to produce professional reports and records using Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel.

Design a simple and customised database for tracking, reporting and sharing data for presentation to a chosen client or customer.

Discuss the importance of computer ethics and principles.

3

BACS 201

Health & Lifestyle

Develop a basic understanding of health from the Biblical perspective.

6

15

Explain the Adventist perspective on healthful living in relation to the connection between spirituality, mind and body.

Analyse the disease trend in the Pacific and its implication for society.

Design resources that will address health issues in a community setting.

 

BACHELOR OF BUSINESS [Information Systems]

The program is designed to prepare graduates for a successful career in designing, operating and managing information systems. It provides a sequential series of studies in Information systems, including hardware, networking, management and administration of information systems, with some exposure to marketing and management. Graduates will have the ability to work as information system analysts and managers and website designers, as well as have a foundation for further studies.

 

A.      Graduate Profile

Graduates will be able to:

Components

Learning Outcomes

Information Systems Studies

Apply fundamental concepts and underlying technologies associated with the internet, computer networks and protocols.

Critically analyse problem situations and design systematic and technological solutions

Creatively design, develop, implement and support websites and databases to meet a range of client specifications

Business Studies

Lead people and organizations through efficient and effective management processes and practices.

Creatively implement advertising strategies, including e-marketing approaches.

Religious & Philosophical Studies

Sympathetically appraise the Seventh-day Adventist faith and demonstrate the responsibilities of having such a faith in their professional and personal life.

Complementary Studies

Utilize ethical research methods and appropriate communication skills in presentations and publications

Demonstrate a healthy lifestyle which contributes to personal and community health.

 

B.      Entry Requirements

Pass in FSF7E or its equivalent including a pass in Accounting OR

PSSC result under 11 including a pass in Accounting

Pass in Foundation Studies [Business]

A pass in the Mature Age examination for those over the age of 22 yrs in the year of entry.

 

C.      Co-curricular Competencies

Competencies

 

Computer Skills

Students will demonstrate general knowledge from the computer systems, use software and hardware, file management, keyboarding and basic word processing skills. This is an elementary level for general computer applications, word processing, spreadsheets and power point presentations.

Literacy

Students will be required to achieve a Level 1 (a minimum of 70% in Entry Level 3) in the Future School Literacy software.

Numeracy

Students will required to achieve a Level 1 (a minimum of 70% in Entry Level 3) in the Future School Literacy software.

 

D.      Sequence

Bachelor of Business [Information Systems]

Level

 

Credits

 

Sem

 

IS Studies

Business Studies

Religious & Philosophical Studies

Complementary Studies

7

360

 

46%

33%

13%

8%

5

60

1

BIIS101

Information Technology

BIBS101

Quantitative Mathematics

 

BICS101

Academic Research & Writing

BIIS102

Computer Principles

 

 

 

 

60

2

BIIS103

Hardware Concepts & Skills

BIBS102

Business Communication

BIRS101

Essentials of Christian Faith

 

BIIS104

Intro to Programming

 

 

 

6

60

1

BIIS201

Intro to Networking

BIBS201

Intro to Marketing

 

 

BIIS202

Website Development

BIBS202

Intro to Management

 

 

 

BIPR201 Websites and Networking Practicum

60

2

BIIS203

Multimedia & Graphics

BIBS203

Small Business & Entrepreneurship

BIRS201

Life & Teachings of Jesus

BICS201

Health & Lifestyle

7

60

1

BIIS301

Database Management

BIBS301

Commercial Law

 

 

BIIS302

Network Administration

BIBS302

Advertising & Promotion Strategy

 

 

 

BIPR301 Network Administration & Database Management Practicum

60

2

BIIS303

System Analysis & Design

BIBS303

Human Resource Knowledge & Management

BIRS301

Applied Christian Ethics

 

BIIS304

Management of IS Systems

 

 

 

 

E.       Module Learning Outcomes

Component 1:Information Systems

No

Module

Learning Outcome

Lev

Cred

1

BIIS 101

Information Technology

Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the fundamentals of data communications.

5

15

Relate the knowledge of data communication to business.

Discuss the types of data communication used in the business world.

Discuss data protocols and their importance in commercial networks.

2

BIIS 102

Computer Principles

Understand the fundamental computer concepts and appreciate their applications in the real world.

5

15

Demonstrate the ability to produce professional reports and records using Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel.

Design a simple customised database for tracking, reporting and sharing data for presentation to a chosen client or customer.

Discuss the importance of computer ethics and principles.

3

BIIS 103

Hardware & Concepts Skills

 

 

 

 

Demonstrate knowledge about major computer components and their functions

5

15

Describe the installation process of installing and removing hardware components successfully

Discuss the range of errors encountered with hardware

Identify the different printer technologies

Demonstrate ability to identify and analyze problem solving techniques for troubleshooting common hardware problems

4

BIIS 104

Introduction to Programming

Outline the basic concepts of programming, its importance in a changing world, and its applications in a business.

5

15

Discuss the building blocks of programming and apply them in any probable business situation.

Develop a software application that uses Visual Basics for a given application area.

Demonstrate the ability to incorporate a range of applications to collect and present data in a professional manner.

5

BIIS 201

Introduction to Networking

Demonstrate an understanding of the fundamentals of computer networks and the Internet

6

15

Examine the principles of reliable data transfer and multi-access control in wired as well as wireless environments

Assess networked systems in terms of performance metrics such as throughput, latencies and resource utilization

Evaluate network applications and protocols used for network error detections and corrections.

6

BIIS 202

Website Development

Explain the World Wide Web (WWW) and its applications

6

15

Demonstrate the ability to plan, analyze, design and implement a simple and professional website ready to be published.

Demonstrate the ability to incorporate multimedia applications to web design.

Discuss the components needed to host and publish a website.

7

BIIS 203

Multimedia & Graphics

Demonstrate the ability to apply appropriate graphic design principles.

6

15

Demonstrate the ability to develop simple and professional designs.

Design a professional and interactive presentation by selecting appropriate multimedia applications.

8

BIIS 301

Database Management

Critically analyze situations for the application of RDBMS (Relational database management system) solutions

7

15

Design a suitable relational data model for a given application area

Examine the functions required and the organizational implications of administrating a RDBMS and its ethical issues

Develop a software application that uses a RDBMS

9

BIIS 302

Network Administration

Demonstrate an understanding of Netowrk Administration

7

15

Demonstrate the abiity to set up Users and computer

Demonstrate the ability to manage access to resources

Demonstrate the knowledge to plan and implement procedures.

10

BIIS 303

System Analysis & Design

Discuss their understanding of the fundamental concepts of systems analysis and designs.

7

15

Investigate existing business systems and select alternative solutions to improve and fulfill any subsequent technical solution.

Demonstrate the ability to evaluate business systems design using modelling techniques to solve business problems.

11

BIIS 304

Management of IS Systems

Demonstrate knowledge of ICT-based organizational issues and the organizational information system development and/or procurement process.

7

15

Investigate, analyze and define the requirements for a viable ICT-based organizational information system and make recommendations on the likely implications, costs and benefits.

Critically evaluate a range of applications and techniques to obtain, process and present data in a professional and informative manner.

Demonstrate the ability to work effectively as a team, taking leadership roles where appropriate, exercising initiative, self-management, cooperation and collaboration in the completion of the module.

Component 2:Business Studies

1

BIBS 101

Quantitative Mathematics

Manipulate algebraic expressions to solve business problems.

5

15

Distinguish between simple interest and compound interest and their application in solving present and future values.

Demonstrate an understanding of the application of annuities to solve future and present values and periodic payments

Demonstrate an understanding in the creation of contracts in terms of bonds and its interest and yield payments.

Interpret and convert statistical data to information to assist in financial decision making.

2

BIBS 102

Business Communication

Discuss the fundamentals of achieving effective communication.

5

15

Demonstrate the ability to write accurate and convincing reports, proposals, letters, agendas and minutes.

Discuss the different types of documents needed when going for a job inteview.

3

BIBS 201

Introduction to Marketing

Explain the meaning of marketing, the process and its relevance in the economy.

6

15

Communicate the significance of consumers to business and the value organizations gained from building customer relationships.

Explain the impact the internal and external environment can have on business and design a marketing mix and strategy to blend with the environment.

Discuss the importance of exploring and competing internationally.

Demonstrate business ethics and social responsibility in all business transactions.

4

BIBS 202

Introduction to Management

Discuss the values of applying good management principles

6

15

Recognize the internal and external factors that impact an organizations management.

Discuss the management functions of planning, organizing, leading staff and controlling.

Demonstrate analytical skills when managing organizations through changes and challenges.

5

BIBS 203

Small Business & Entrepreneurship

Discuss the role of entrepreneurship in economic growth and development, and the opportunities for creative innovations as a means of sustainability.

6

15

Evaluate the options of doing business and developing strategies to capture those opportunities.

Apply the key management functions for a successful small business.

6

BIBS 301 Commercial Law

Demonstrate the ability to understand legal issues relating to any aspects of operation of a business.

7

15

Discuss the significance of legal treaty in commercial transaction and the menace that may emerge if agreements and contracts are breached.

Discuss the significance of legal treaty in commercial transaction and the menace that may emerge if agreements and contracts are breached.

Critique the different business entities, their legal constituent and the rights and liabilities linked to office holders and consumer protection.

Recognize the various legal obligations associated with financial operations of companies.

7

BIBS 302

Advertising & Promotion Strategy

Recognize the importance of advertising and promotions in all marketing applications.

7

15

Analyze the market and segment it into different consumer segments and determine a strategy that can best position a brand in a segment.

Construct an advertising strategy for a product selecting the most appropriate medium to reach the targeted consumer

Synthesize different communication principles to successfully reach consumers.

Practice ethical conduct in advertising honouring professional regulations and standards

8

BIBS 303

Human Resource Knowledge & Management

Critique HR from a strategic perspective.

7

15

Evaluate the recruitment tools for securing effective employees and retaining them.

Analyse the leadership styles practiced by management in different levels of an organisation

Discuss strategies managers can utilise to proactively prevent conflict

Component 3:Religious & Philosophical Studies

1

BIRS 101

Essentials of Christian Faith

Demonstrate an understanding of Adventist doctrines as biblically centered and rooted in Christ.

5

15

Illustrate how selected doctrines are still important in the 21st century.

Explain the Adventist view of selected controversial doctrines.

2

BIRS 201

Life & Teaching of Jesus

Construct the historical, political and socio-cultural background to the four gospels and deduce implications for the ministry of Jesus.

6

15

Demonstrate an understanding of the context and content of the parables and miracles of Jesus.

Establish the connection of the gospel message to the daily growth of faith in the One whom the gospel proclaims.

Interpret a selected story, parable, or miracle of Jesus.

3

BIRS 301

Applied Christian Ethics

Apply knowledge of Scripture and its principles and values in moral reasoning and decision making.

7

15

Evaluate major ethical issues and dilemmas from biblical, contemporary Christian and Seventh-day Adventist perspectives.

Formulate appropriate Christian ethical strategies for personal and professional development in the work place.

Demonstrate an understanding of key ethical concepts presented in the module.

Component 4:Complementary Studies

1

BICS 101

Academic Research & Writing

Demonstrate competence in a variety of types of academic writing.

5

15

Demonstrate competence in locating and making effective use of secondary research.

Generate and analyse a quality questionnaire for a tertiary assignment.

Demonstrate oral competency in the English language.

2

BICS 201

Health & Life Styles

Develop a basic understanding of health from the Biblical perspective.

6

15

Explain the Adventist perspective on healthful living in relation to the connection between spirituality, mind and body.

Analyse the disease trend in the Pacific and its implication for society.

Design resources that will address health issues in a local community setting.

 

BACHELOR OF BUSINESS [Marketing]

The program is designed to prepare graduates for a successful career in either marketing or management. It provides a sequential series of studies in approaches to national and international marketing and management of Pacific industries, knowledge in managing human capital and an awareness of legal issues pertaining to business. Graduates will have the ability to work as marketers and managers, to operate and manage a business profitably in private, national and international contexts, as well as have a foundation for future studies.

 

A.      Graduate Profile

Graduates will be able to:

Components

Learning Outcomes

Marketing Studies

Critically analyse buyer behaviour in relevant national and international markets for Pacific products

Creatively implement advertising strategies, including e-marketing approaches

Business Studies

Lead people and organizations through efficient and effective management processes and practices.

Apply lively imagination to the application of management principles and practices in private, national and international contexts.

Religious & Philosophical Studies

Sympathetically appraise the Seventh-day Adventist faith and demonstrate the responsibilities of having such a faith in their professional and personal life.

Complementary Studies

Utilize ethical research methods and appropriate communication skills in presentations and publications

Demonstrate a healthy lifestyle which contributes to personal and community health.

 

B.      Entry Requirements

Pass in FSF7E or its equivalent including a pass in Accounting OR

PSSC result under 11 including a pass in Accounting

Pass in Foundation Studies [Business]

A pass in the Mature Age examination for those over the age of 22 yrs in the year of entry.

 

C.      Co-curricular Competencies

Competencies

 

Computer Skills

Students will demonstrate general knowledge from the computer systems, use software and hardware, file management, keyboarding and basic word processing skills. This is an elementary level for general computer applications, word processing, spreadsheets and power point presentations.

Literacy

Students will be required to achieve a Level 1 (a minimum of 70% in Entry Level 3) in the Future School Literacy software.

Numeracy

Students will required to achieve a Level 1 (a minimum of 70% in Entry Level 3) in the Future School Literacy software.

 

D.      Sequence

Bachelor of Business [Marketing]

Level

 

Credits

 

Sem

 

Marketing Studies

Business Studies

Religious & Philosophical Studies

Complementary Studies

7

360

 

42%

38%

13%

8%

5

60

1

BMMS101

Intro to Marketing

BMBS101

Intro to Management

 

BMCS101

Academic Research & Writing

 

BMBS102

Intro to Financial Statements

 

 

 

60

2

BMMS102

Buyer Behaviour

BMBS103

Business Communication

BMRS101

Essentials of Christian Faith

 

 

BMBS104

Micro Economics

 

 

6

60

1

BMMS201

International Marketing & Management

BMBS201

Organisation & Management

 

 

BMMS202

Tourism Marketing & Management

 

 

 

BMMS203

Website Development

 

 

 

 

BMPR201 International Marketing Practicum

60

2

BMMS204

Multimedia & Graphics

BMBS202

Small Business & Entrepreneurship

BMRS201

Life & Teachings of Jesus

BMCS201

Health & Lifestyle

7

60

1

BMMS301

Advertising & Promotion Strategy

BMBS301

Commercial Law

 

 

BMMS302

E-Marketing & Strategic Development

 

 

 

BMMS303

Agricultural Marketing

 

 

 

 

BMPR301 E-Marketing Practicum

60

2

BMMS303

Service Marketing

BMBS302

Human Resource Knowledge & Management

BMRS301

Applied Christian Ethics

 

 

BMBS303

Macro Economics

 

 

 

E.       Module Learning Outcomes

Component 1:Marketing Studies

No

Module

 Learning Outcome

Lev

Cred

1

BMMS 101

Introduction to Marketing

Explain the meaning of marketing, the process and its relevance in the economy.

5

15

Communicate the significance of consumers to business and the value organizations gained from building customer relationships.

Explain the impact the internal and external environment can have on business and design a marketing mix and strategy to blend with the environment.

Discuss the importance of exploring and competing internationally.

Demonstrate business ethics and social responsibility in all business transactions.

2

BMMS 102

Buyer Behavior

Synthesize buyer behavior and marketing theory to generate marketing application.

5

15

Assess the impact of diverse culture on consumer behavior and how consumers perceive the marketing applications.

Analyze the market and segment it into different consumer segments.

Use concepts to explain consumer decisions in the market place.

Explore the behavioral profiles of specific market segments and develop strategies that target each group.

Design market communication applications that convince and convict consumers to respond positively.

3

BMMS 201

International Marketing & Management

Discuss the ways in which international marketing and management interact with other business functions to create customer and shareholder value.

6

15

Determine the key frameworks, concepts and theories of internationally marketing and management and derive managerial skills.

Differentiate the various processes for effective international marketing and management strategies to ensure success.

4

BMMS 202

Tourism Marketing & Management

Determine the significance of Pacific tourism to the national and global economy.

6

15

 

Critique the various processes that will successfully market the Pacific Islands’ tourist product to national and international audiences.

Discuss the value of building customer relationships through providing quality service.

Analyse contemporary issues relating to the marketing of Pacific Islands’ tourism and hospitality.

5

BMMS 203

Website Development

Understand the history of the World Wide Web (WWW) and its applications.

6

15

Acquire the ability to plan, analyze, design and implement or build profession yet simple websites that can be publish or hosted in a free website hosting site.

6

BMMS 204

Multimedia & Graphics

Understand and apply the basic graphic designing principles.

6

15

Apply the basic designing principles covered in class to design simple yet professional designs that will be used to present a message in a more interactive and professional way.

Use Photoshop and Adobe Flash Player as tools to design professional designs and presentations.

7

BMMS 301

Advertising & Promotion Strategy

Recognize the importance of advertising and promotions in all marketing applications.

7

15

Analyze the market and segment it into different consumer segments and determine a strategy that ca best position a brand in a segment.

Construct an advertising strategy for a product selecting the most appropriate medium to reach the targeted consumer

Synthesize different communication principles to successfully reach consumers.

Practice ethical conduct in advertising honouring professional regulations and standards

8

BMMS 302

E- Marketing & Strategic Development

Evaluate the strategic advantage to a business of using e-marketing over traditional marketing approaches.

7

15

Analyze how e-marketing can deliver a satisyfing online experience as well as communicating the company’s products or services, and linking business to business and business to consumers.

Critique the e-marketing practices of an organisation and determines the ethical and issues associated with such practices.

9

BMMS 303

Agriculture Marketing

Differentiate the market concepts and their significance to agriculture marketing success.

7

15

Evaluate market strategies which would best achieve the objectives of agricultural market.

A market research to determine the opportunities and segment the market to capture those opportunities.

A strategic analysis of the 4 P’s in relation to consumer satisfaction I agricultural service and production.

10

BMMS 304

Service Marketing

Differentiate between service characteristics and tangible products and how to use the service differentiation to ensure success for the firm.

7

15

Develop and integrate relationship marketing to every application of service interaction to ensure excellent customer service.

Justify the usage and the significance of market segmenting in service and identify the best market mix for each segment to ensure customer satisfaction.

Integrate new technology in planning and management of service delivery by service providers and managers.

Apply service business ethics and social responsibility in service delivery.

Component 2:Business Studies

1

BMBS 101

Introduction to Management

Discuss the values of applying good management principles

5

15

Recognize the internal and external factors that impact an organizations management.

Discuss the management functions of planning, organizing, leading staff and controlling.

Demonstrate analytical skills when managing organizations through changes and challenges.

2

BMBS 102

Introduction to Financial Statements

Demonstrate a clear understanding on the completion of the accounting cycle to prepare financial statements used for financial reporting and decision making.

5

15

Account for the processes involved in the retail operations of inventory transactions, including the reporting of appropriate ledgers and special journals in an accounting system.

Demonstrate an understanding in the formation of partnerships, its operations and reporting.

Clearly distinguish between the different approaches and regulations used to account for major components of financial statements in terms of assets and liabilities.

3

BMBS 103

Micro Economics

Explain how economist goes about their work as social science and policy advisers.

5

15

Calculate and explain the factor that influences the cross elasticity of demand and income elasticity of demand.

Explain the sources if economic inequality and its trend.

Identify the winners and losers in international trade.

4

BMBS 104

Business Communication

Discuss the fundamentals of achieving effective communication.

5

15

Demonstrate the ability to write accurate and convincing reports, proposals, letters, agendas and minutes.

Discuss the different types of documents needed when going for a job interview.

5

BMBS 201

Organization & Management

Describe the importance of studying organizational and behavior and management.

6

15

Compare and contrast different approaches to management and the relevance of these approaches in contemporary Pacific organisations.

Explore different approaches for organizations to show ethical responsibility to the society and community.

Evaluate the organization strategic plan and structure and determine the practice and the variables that best suits an organization.

6

BMBS 202

Small Business & Entrepreneurship

Discuss the role of entrepreneurship in economic growth and development, and the opportunities for creative innovations as a means of sustainability.

6

15

Evaluate the options of doing business and developing strategies to capture those opportunities.

Apply the key management functions for a successful small business.

7

BMBS 301

Commercial Law

Demonstrate the ability to understand legal issues relating to any aspects of operation of a business.

7

15

Discuss the significance of legal treaty in commercial transaction and the menace that may emerge if agreements and contracts are breached.

Discuss the significance of legal treaty in commercial transaction and the menace that may emerge if agreements and contracts are breached.

Critique the different business entities, their legal constituent and the rights and liabilities linked to office holders and consumer protection.

Recognize the various legal obligations associated with financial operations of companies.

8

BMBS 302

Human Resource Knowledge & Management

Critique HR from a strategic perspective.

7

15

Evaluate the recruitment tools for securing effective employees and retaining them.

Analyse the leadership styles practiced by management in different levels of an organisation

Discuss strategies managers can utilise to proactively prevent conflict

9

BMBS 201

Macro Economics

 

Explain economic growth and how potential GDP grows.

6

15

Explain theories of economic growth and policies to increase the growth rate.

Analyse the main schools of thought in macroeconomics today.

Discuss fiscal and monetary policy.

Component 3:Religious & Philosophical Studies

1

BMRS 101

Essentials of Christian Faith

Demonstrate an understanding of Adventist doctrines as biblically centered and rooted in Christ.

5

15

Illustrate how selected doctrines are still important in the 21st century.

Explain the Adventist view of selected controversial doctrines.

2

BMRS 201

Life & Teaching of Jesus

Construct the historical, political and socio-cultural background to the four gospels and deduce implications for the ministry of Jesus.

6

15

Demonstrate an understanding of the context and content of the parables and miracles of Jesus.

Establish the connection of the gospel message to the daily growth of faith in the One whom the gospel proclaims.

Interpret a selected story, parable, or miracle of Jesus.

3

BMRS 301

Applied Christian Ethics

Apply knowledge of Scripture and its principles and values in moral reasoning and decision making.

7

15

Evaluate major ethical issues and dilemmas from biblical, contemporary Christian and Seventh-day Adventist perspectives.

Formulate appropriate Christian ethical strategies for personal and professional development in the work place.

Demonstrate an understanding of key ethical concepts presented in the module.

Component 4:Complementary Studies

1

BMCS 101

Academic Research & Writing

 

Demonstrate competence in a variety of types of academic writing.

5

15

Demonstrate competence in locating and making effective use of secondary research.

Generate and analyse a quality questionnaire for a tertiary assignment.

Demonstrate oral competency in the English language.

2

BMCS 201

Health & Lifestyle

Develop a basic understanding of health from the Biblical perspective.

6

15

Explain the Adventist perspective on healthful living in relation to the connection between spirituality, mind and body.

Analyse the disease trend in the Pacific and its implication for society.

Design resources that will address health issues in a local community setting.

 

BACHELOR OF EDUCATION HONS [Primary]

The program is primarily designed to equip graduates to teach competently in primary schools throughout the region and contribute to the wholistic development of children. It provides a sequential series of studies in educational, curricular and religious disciplines. Graduates will have the ability to teach in the classroom, lead in schools and resource other professionals as well as have the foundation for further postgraduate study.

 

A.      Graduate Profile

Graduates will be able to:

Components

Learning Outcomes

Education Studies

Effectively apply a variety of educational concepts and theories in the diverse and ever-changing environment of the school and classroom.

Creatively apply psychology, counseling and leadership concepts to support student learning and behavior management, and the administration of the school.

Critically reflect on the learning, teaching and assessment in their school as a means of achieving good practice.

Curriculum Studies

Demonstrate competency in creatively using a variety of appropriate pedagogies across the Primary School curriculum.

Religious & Philosophical Studies

Sympathetically appraise the Seventh-day Adventist faith and demonstrate the responsibilities of having such a faith in their professional and personal life.

Integrate the philosophy of holistic education throughout the primary school curriculum, including values education.

Complementary Studies

Utilize ethical research methods and appropriate communication skills in presentations and publications

Demonstrate a healthy lifestyle which contributes to personal and community health.

 

B.      Entry Requirements

230 points in FSF7E or its equivalent including a pass in English & Mathematics OR

PSSC result under 11 including a pass in English & Mathematics

Pass in Foundation Studies [Education] including a pass in English & Mathematics

A pass in the Mature Age examination for those over the age of 22 yrs in the year of entry.

 

C.      Co-curricular Competencies

Competencies

 

Computer Skills

Students will demonstrate general knowledge from the computer systems, use software and hardware, file management, keyboarding and basic word processing skills. This is an elementary level for general computer applications, word processing, spreadsheets and power point presentations.

Literacy

Students will be required to achieve a Level 1 (a minimum of 70% in Entry Level 3) in the Future School Literacy software.

Numeracy

Students will required to achieve a Level 1 (a minimum of 70% in Entry Level 3) in the Future School Literacy software.

Conversational Vernacular

Students will demonstrate competence in the professional use of their vernacular and conversational competence (reading level - age 12) of other major languages in their country of origin

 

 

D.      Sequence

Bachelor of Education Hons [Primary]

Level

 

Credits

 

Sem

 

Education Studies

Curriculum Studies

Religious & Philosophical Studies

Complementary Studies

 8

480

 

25-31%

38%

13-19%

16%

5

60

1

BPES101

Learning & Teaching

BPUS101

Curriculum Health & PE

BPRS101

Essentials of the Christian Faith

BPCS101

Academic Research & Writing

 

60

2

BPES102

Cultural Diversity in Education

BPUS102

Curriculum Art, Craft & Music

 

 

 

BPES103

Human Development & Educational Psychology

Curriculum Vernacular BPUS103 Fijian

BPUS104 Hindi & BPUS105 Others

 

 

6

60

1

 

BPUS201

Curriculum Literacy

 

 

 

BPUS202

Curriculum Mathematics for Lower Primary

 

 

 

BPUS203

Curriculum Social Science & Science for Lower Primary

 

 

 

BPUS204

Curriculum Bible

 

 

 

BPPR201 Lower Primary Practicum

60

2

BPES201

Assessment in Education

BPUS205

Curriculum Resources & Skills

BPRS201

Life & Teachings of Jesus

 

BPES202

Inclusive Education

 

 

 

7

60

1

BPES301

Classroom Management

BPUS301

Curriculum Mathematics for Upper Primary

BPRS301

Ethics, Christian Morals & Values

 

 

BPUS302

Curriculum Social Science/Science for Upper Primary

 

 

 

 

BPPR301 Upper Primary Practicum

60

2

BPES302

Educational Leadership and Administration

BPUS303

Curriculum Bilingual Education

BPRS302

Philosophy of Adventist Education

 

BPES303

Principles of Counseling

 

 

 

8

60

1

 

 

PPRS4XX

Religious & Philosophical Studies

PPCS401

Introduction to Research

 

60

2

PPES4XX

Education Studies

PPUS4XX

Curriculum Studies

 

PPCS402

Research

 

E.       Module Learning Outcomes

Required Components

The following modules are required in the Bachelor of Education Hons [Primary]:

Component 1:Education Studies

No

Module

Learning Outcomes

Lev

Cred

1

BPES 101

Learning & Teaching

Explain a variety of theoretical concepts and principles that encourage effective learning.

5

15

Discuss a variety of methods that may be used in the Pacific classroom to motivate learning and good behaviour and may cater for different students’ needs.

Implement quality teaching plans that will encourage effective learning.

Utilize the theory of multiple intelligences to teach any primary school subject.

Describe how fath may be integrated into learning

2

BPES 102

Cultural Diversity in Education

Appreciate cultures other than one’s own.

5

15

Apply the knowledge of cultural anthropology to life in Pacific societies today.

Understanding of the dynamics of cross-culture communication.

Define his/her role as a peacemaker and cultural bridge-builder between different cultural and religious groupings.

Develop skills for teaching cross-culturally.

3

BPES 103

Human Development & Educational Psychology

Demonstrate an informed understanding of the different theories of human development in relation to children’s learning

5

15

Discuss a variety of factors that impact the development of children.

Demonstrate competence in applying a specific psychology theory to effective teaching and learning.

4

BPES 201

Assessment in Education

Differentiate between various terms and concepts related to assessment and measurement.

6

15

Demonstrate competence in using a variety of assessment tools.

Discuss assessment trends in regional schools.

Justify the use of assessment in education and the need to assess appropriately

5

BPES 202

Inclusive Education

Demonstrate an informed knowledge of the historical foundations of Inclusive Education

6

15

Critique inclusive education in the modern Pacific context.

Relate knowledge of diasabilities to managing students’ learning.

Evaluate selected approaches for including special needs children in mainstream education.

6

BPES 301

Classroom Management

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the importance of classroom management and what may support it.

7

15

Apply principles for effective classroom management.

Demonstrate teaching competency through sound practice that is evidenced by quality professional documentation.

7

BPES 302

Educational Leadership & Administration

Demonstrate an understanding of effective leadership and its relevance.

7

15

Discuss the role and responsibilities of a Christian educational administrator. 

Generate plans that are required of leaders.

8

BPES 303

Principles of Counseling

Demonstrate an informed understanding of counselling and its importance

7

15

Critique the Christian and secular approaches to counselling.

Apply counseling skills to a range of children’s problems.

Justify a code of ethics for counsellors.

Component 2:Curriculum Studies

1

BPUS 101

Curriculum Health & PE

Demonstrate knowledge of rules for cultural and professional games.

5

15

Discuss health concerns faced by Pacific Island Nations.

Evaluate the importance of good physical health and its implications for young people.

Explain the significance of various parts of the human body.

Construct a curriculum document for Health & PE in a Pacific primary school.

2

BPUS 102

Curriculum Art, Craft & Music

Demonstrate an understanding of Adventist doctrines as biblically centered and rooted in Christ.

5

15

Demonstrate competency in a variety of skills useful for teaching and utilising art, craft and music in the Primary pacific context.

Demonstrate an informed understanfing of the importance of teaching art, craft and music in Pacific primary schools.

3

BPUS 103

Curriculum Vernacular

(Fijian)

Discuss policies and views related to the use of the vernacular in Pacific primary schools

5

15

Demonstrate an informed understanding of the origin, development and usage of the Fijian language in its cultural context.

Demonstrate familiarity with the Fijian vernacular curriculum.

Apply appropriate strategies to teach Fijian.

4

BPUS 104

Curriculum Vernacular

(Hindi)

Discuss policies and views related to the use of the vernacular in Pacific primary schools

5

15

Demonstrate an informed understanding of the origin, development and usage of the Hindi language in its cultural context.

Demonstrate familiarity with the Hindi vernacular curriculum.

Apply appropriate strategies to teach Hindi.

5

BPUS 105

Curriculum Vernacular

(Other)

Discuss policies and views related to the use of the vernacular in Pacific primary schools

5

15

Demonstrate an informed understanding of the origin, development and usage of a selected Pacific language in its cultural context.

Demonstrate familiarity with a vernacular curriculum (Students from countries with a vernacular curriculum). OR Demonstrate familiarity with a Pacific vernacular.

Apply appropriate strategies to teach (or teach through the use of) a selected Pacific language.

6

BPUS 201

Curriculum Literacy

Demonstrate an informed understanding of “literacy”and its relationship to modern life.

6

15

Demonstrate an informed understanding of the rationale behind various approaches to teaching reading and writing.

Create appropriate activities to enhance literacy learning in the Pacific context.

Evaluate the effectiveness of selected strategies for teaching literacy.

Argue the importance of good English in Pacific schools.

Diagnose children’s reading problems and what may be done to overcome them.

Demonstrate an understanding of how literacy development in a Pacific primary school can be linked to faith development and the thematic approach to learning.

7

BPUS 202

Curriculum Mathematics for Lower Primary

Design appropriate and essential curriculum documents that may be used to teach mathematics effectively in primary schools.

6

15

Demonstrate an informed understanding of the primary school mathematical content for lower primary.

Critique a variety of strategies for teaching mathematics in the Pacific context.

Explore ways of integrating faith into teaching and learning.

8

BPUS 203

Curriculum Social Science and Science for Lower Primary

Demonstrate an informed understanding of Social Studies theories.

6

15

Utilise selected theories about learning to develop effective teaching practice.

Implement original lesson plans that will encourage effective learning in science and social science.

Discuss ways of integrating faith into the science and social science curriculum.

9

BPUS 204

Curriculum Bible

Explain the strategic role of the Bible in the curriculum.

6

15

Demonstrate an informed understanding of the Seventh-day Adventist Pacific Bible curriculum.

Appraise the value of using a variety of effective teaching strategies in the Bible classroom.

Utilise original and interesting Bible-centred learning activities.

Discuss how faith may be developed.

Explore strategies for assessing the affective and spiritual domains of learning.

Apply the principles of integrating faith and learning into the primary school curriculum.

10

BPUS 205

Curriculum Resources & Skills

Demonstrate an informed understanding of what Pacific primary school resources can include.

6

15

Justify the use of a range of resources to enhance teaching and learning in primary curricula.

Demonstrate the effective use of a blackboard.

Utilise IT to find a rang of resources apprpriate for the Pacific primary context.

Use a variety of skills and source materials to create resources for use in various primary school subjects in the Pacific context.

Demonstrate how both acquired and created resources may be used effectively in Pacific classrooms to enhance teaching and learning.

11

BPUS 301

Curriculum Maths for Upper Primary

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the mathematics curriculum of the upeer primary school.

7

15

Generate teaching and learning plans that facilitate effective mathematics learning.

Evaluate a variety of strategies for teaching mathematics.

Design a variety of strategies which could be used for assessing mathematics.

Evaluate ways of integrating faith and learning into teaching the upper mathematics curriculum.

12

BPUS 302

Curriculum Social Science and Science for Upper Primary

Demonstrate an informed understanding of the importance of a positive learning environment in Social Science.

7

15

Construct an effective Social Science teaching unit.

Create appropriate resources to enhance Social Science learning in the Pacific primary school classroom.

Discuss the importance of citizenship education for the Pacific and how it may be integrated into the Social Science curriculum.

Discuss ways of integrating faith into the Social Science and Science curricula.

Demonstrate an informed understanding of the content and importance of the upper primary science curriculum.

Generate a teaching an learning project that facilitates effective science learning.

13

BPUS 303

Curriculum TESOL

Discuss language acquisition theories and how their insights may be applied to teaching English as a second language in the Pacific context.

7

15

Explain some important differences between selected Pacific languages and English.

Discuss a variety of factors impacting individual learner’s acquisition of English as their second language.

Evaluate a variety of strategies deemed useful for TESOL.

Utilise a variety of original and collected resources for teaching selected aspects of the English language.

Component 3:Religious & Philosophical Studies

1

BPRS 101

Essentials of Christian Faith

Demonstrate an understanding of Adventist doctrines as biblically centered and rooted in Christ.

5

15

Illustrate how selected doctrines are still important in the 21st century.

Explain the Adventist view of selected controversial doctrines.

2

BPRS 201

Life & Teachings of Jesus

Construct the historical, political and socio-cultural background to the four gospels and deduce implications for the ministry of Jesus.

6

15

Deduce the implications of the historical, political and socio-cultural backgrounds for the ministry of Jesus.

Effectively utilise principles evidenced in the life and teachings of Jesus in a Pacific primary school context.

Establish the connection of the gospel message to the daily growth of faith in the One whom the gospel proclaims.

Using the gospel accounts, answer selected objections to the death and resurrection of Jesus.

3

BPRS 301

Ethics, Christian Morals & Values

Discuss the foundations of Pacific ethics, morals and values.

7

15

Demonstrate an understanding of what ethics, morals and values are and their relationship to education and healthy relationships.

Explain why and how moral values are and are not developed.

Evaluate possible responses to modern ethical issues and moral dilemmas relevant to the Pacific context.

4

BPRS 302

Philosophy of Adventist Education

Demonstrate an understanding of different worldviews and the Philosophy of Adventist Education.

7

15

Contrast human nature before and after sin and its impact on education. 

Discuss the significance of the Eden Home School and its relationship to the school of the hereafter.

Justify implementing a holistic curriculum in a Pacific primary school.

Argue the importance of character development and its significance for discipline.

Component 4:Complementary Studies

1

BPCS 101

Academic Research & Writing

Demonstrate competence in a variety of types of academic writing

5

15

Demonstrate competence in locating and making effective use of secondary research.

Generate and analyse a quality questionnaire for a tertiary assignment.

Demonstrate oral competency in the English language.

2

PPCS 401

Introduction to Research

Critically assess different research methodologies and their respective tools and processes.

8

30

Research published work on a specific topic to identify what is known, what is not know and what merits further research.

Demonstrate a critical awareness of a variety of research issues including ethical issues in, and codes of practice for, research.

Justify the rationale for the selection of a methodology to research a specific issue.

3

PPCS 402

Research

Critically analyse questions and synthesise relevant research to formulate responses that may expand and even redefine aspects of existing theories, knowledge and practices.

8

30

 

 

Elective Components

The following modules are offered in the final year of the program. Students must choose two modules (60 credits) from this list:

Component 1:Education Studies

No

Module

Learning Outcomes

Lev

Cr

1

PPES 401

School & Teacher Effectiveness

Utilise literature and key developments in school and teacher effectiveness to argue their importance for qualify education.

8

30

Adapt models assessing school and teacher effectiveness to the Pacific region.

Discuss key issues that impact school and teacher effectiveness.

Justify selected strategies for improving school and teacher effectiveness in the Pacific context.

Component 2:Curriculum Studies

1

PPUS 401

Curriculum Development Studies

Justify curriculum development.

8

30

Critically evaluate strategies for ensuring faith is integrated into school curricula and curriculum development.

Critically evaluate the appropriateness of selected curriculum models for the Pacific context.

Discuss selected issues related to, and priorities for, making curricula relevant to the Pacific region in the 21st century.

Critique issues/problems impacting the implementation of curriculum reforms/changes and their possible solutions.

2

PPUS 402

Culture and Education in the Pacific

Explore in depth how selected aspects of indigenous knowledge and skills sustained Pacific people in the past and how they can help sustain Pacific people today.

8

30

Evaluate the importance of both valuing and retaining indigenous knowledge and skills in one’s personal life and in modern education.

Appraise how effectively modern children know about and value their own traditional culture and the cultures of other communities.

Justify ways of improving the content, delivery and assessment of selected Pacific primary curricula to effectively transmit and blend both indigenous and modern knowledge, values and skills.

Component 3:Religious & Philosophical Studies

1

PPRS 401

Christian Schools as Caring Communities

 

Generate a student and staff welfare policy for a Pacific Christian school that embodies the special character of a Christian school.

8

30

Discuss a range of welfare issues that impact students’ achievement and/or school relationships.

Evaluate for the Christian Pacific contact strategies that may appropriately address issues that negatively impact a student’s school life.

Discuss how Pacific Christian schools should respond to a variety of issues that negatively impact teachers’ professional performance.

2

PTPS 402

Supervised Pastoral Education

Demonstrate competence in the use of the action/reflection model of self-evaluation of one’s ministry practice resulting in an awareness of self as chaplain and of the ways that one’s ministry affects others.

8

30

Compassionately display advanced interpersonal skills in active listening and empathetic responses.

Critically assess pastoral needs, taking into consideration differences in culture, spirituality, ethnicity, socioeconomic background, psychological and emotional expressions.

Demonstrate through the use of critical theological reflection creative ways of communicating theological truth to people faced with a life crisis, theirs or a loved one.

Demonstrate a sound knowledge and practice of the Code of Ethics, expected ethical behaviour and the need for confidentiality between chaplain and patient/parishioner/ client.

 

Nested Programs of Study

I.        Postgraduate Diploma in Education

The program is primarily designed to enhance graduates’ ability to take an active role in increasing the quality of the educational experience provided by Pacific schools. It does this by providing related studies in educational, curriculum, religious and philosophical, and complementary disciplines. Together these studies will enhance graduates’ abilities to generate an effective learning environment in Pacific schools through facilitating responses to curriculum change, through enhancing school and teacher effectiveness, through developing caring community relationships and through researching as a means of improving Pacific education.

 

A.      Graduate Profile

Graduates will be able to:

Components

Learning Outcomes

Education Studies

Effectively apply through critical reflection a range of concepts regarding increasing school and teacher effectiveness in the changing Pacific context.

Curriculum Studies

Demonstrate a commitment to actively and constructively participate in, and effectively apply, curriculum changes mandated by Pacific Islands’ governments.

Religious & Philosophical Studies

Sympathetically appraise the Seventh-day Adventist faith and demonstrate the responsibilities of having such a faith in their professional and personal life.

Demonstrate a commitment to enhancing the quality of school life through the holistic development of a caring community.

Complementary Studies

Utilize ethical research methods and appropriate communication skills in presentations and publications

Utilize ethical methods to research selected Pacific educational issues.

 

B.      Entry Requirements

Bachelors degree in Education OR

Graduate Diploma in Adventist Education or its equivalent

 

C.      Sequence

Postgraduate Diploma in Education [Primary]

Level

 

Credits

 

Sem

 

Education Studies

Curriculum Studies

Religious & Philosophical Studies

Complementary Studies

8

120

 

25%

25%

25%

25%

8

60

1

 

 

PPRS4XX

Religious & Philosophical Studies

PPCS401

Introduction to Research

 

60

2

PPES4XX

Education Studies

PPUS4XX

Curriculum Studies

 

 

 

 

 

D.      Module Learning Outcomes

Required Modules

The following modules are required in the Postgraduate Diploma in Education:

Component 4:Complementary Studies

1

 

PPCS 401

Introduction to Research

 

Critically assess different research methodologies and their respective tools and processes.

8

30

Research published work on a specific topic to identify what is known, what is not known and what merits further research.

Demonstrate a critical awareness of a variety of research issues including ethical issues in, and codes of practice for, research.

Justify the rationale for the selection of a methodology to research a specific issue.

 

 

Elective Modules

The following module are offered in the Postgraduate Diploma in Education. Students must choose three modules (90 credits) from this list.

Component 1:Education Studies

No

Module

Learning Outcomes

Lev

Cr

1

PPES 401

School & Teacher Effectiveness

Utilise literature and key developments in school and teacher effectiveness to argue their importance for qualify education.

8

30

Adapt models assessing school and teacher effectiveness to the Pacific region.

Discuss key issues that impact school and teacher effectiveness.

Justify selected strategies for improving school and teacher effectiveness in the Pacific context.

Component 2:Curriculum Studies

1

PPUS 401

Curriculum Development Studies

Justify curriculum development.

8

30

Critically evaluate strategies for ensuring faith is integrated into school curricula and curriculum development.

Critically evaluate the appropriateness of selected curriculum models for the Pacific context.

Discuss selected issues related to, and priorities for, making curricula relevant to the Pacific region in the 21st century.

Critique issues/problems impacting the implementation of curriculum reforms/changes and their possible solutions.

2

PPUS 402

Culture and Education in the Pacific

Explore in depth how selected aspects of indigenous knowledge and skills sustained Pacific people in the past and how they can help sustain Pacific people today.

8

30

Evaluate the importance of both valuing and retaining indigenous knowledge and skills in one’s personal life and in modern education.

Appraise how effectively modern children know about and value their own traditional culture and the cultures of other communities.

Justify ways of improving the content, delivery and assessment of selected Pacific primary curricula to effectively transmit and blend both indigenous and modern knowledge, values and skills.

Component 3:Religious & Philosophical Studies

1

PPRS 401

Christian Schools as Caring Communities

 

Generate a student and staff welfare policy for a Pacific Christian school that embodies the special character of a Christian school.

8

30

Discuss a range of welfare issues that impact students’ achievement and/or school relationships.